G-MZLL

Edenbridge Town figure-of-eight Rans S-6ESD XL Coyote II

13-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Golf, Mike, Zulu, Lima, Lima

Edenbridge Town figure-of-eight Rans S-6ESD XL Coyote II

13-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Chicory and Ragwort

14-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Airrcaft movement

14-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Morris

14-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Wheat

14-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Notice

Stone Bridge Trust

14-Jul-19 • Jerry Attricht on Flickr

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Edenbridge Town to Hever walk

A gentle stroll on the Kent/Surrey border, incorporating the first part of the Eden Valley Walk

Edenbridge Town to Hever
Length

Main Walk: 18 km (11.2 miles). Four hours 10 minutes walking time. For the whole excursion including trains, sights and meals, allow at least 8 hours.

Figure-of-8 Walk: 13¾ km (8.6 miles). Three hours 10 minutes walking time.

Short Walk: 12¼ km (7.6 miles). Two hours 45 minutes walking time.

† Add 3¼ km (2.0 miles; 50 minutes) if taking the extension via Hever village.

OS Map

Explorer 147. Edenbridge Town, map reference TQ445466, is in Kent, 8 km SE of Oxted.

Toughness

2 out of 10 (1 for the shorter walks).

Features

This easy walk in the Eden Valley is centered around the small town of Edenbridge, near the Kent/Surrey border. A settlement developed here at a river crossing on the London–Lewes Roman road, still evident in the town's long straight High Street. In the 12thC an abbot called Eadhelm ordered a bridge to be built over the river and the Anglo-Saxon “Eadhelmsbrigge” gave its name to the River Eden as well as evolving into the modern town name. There are still many medieval buildings on the town's High Street, one of which houses the Eden Valley Museum (free entry; limited opening hours).

The walk essentially consists of two short loops around the town plus an extension. The eastern loop is a gently undulating walk through meadows and farm fields on both sides of the river. The western loop is mostly through water meadows surrounding the river and two of its tributaries, Kent Brook and Eden Brook, going out as far as Cernes Farm. This remote spot is the unlikely starting point of the Eden Valley Walk (EVW) and the remainder of the walk is along the first part of this waymarked trail, back through Edenbridge and on to the next station down the line, Hever. The ending overlaps (in reverse) the start of the Hever to Ashurst walk (#175).

Edenbridge is prone to severe flooding and markers showing the height of the flood waters in 1958 and 1968 can be found around the town. Better flood defences have since been built but this walk will be problematic after prolonged rain, and might be muddy at any time.

Walk Options

The final section of the walk (to Hever) is probably the least interesting, so if you are not planning to do the full EVW you could simply return from Edenbridge Town after completing the second loop, making a symmetrical Figure-of-8 Walk.

The second part of the EVW is described in this walk's companion, the Hever to Tonbridge walk (#345). If your aim is to complete the full waymarked trail you could use these directions to carry on past Hever station to Chiddingstone, Penshurst or even all the way to Tonbridge. In that case you might prefer to skip this walk's first loop, which has a couple of short overlaps with the EVW (in the reverse direction). By itself this combination makes a reasonably varied Short Walk, although you would have to go 1½ km past Hever station into the village for a second refreshment stop.

Transport

There are two stations in Edenbridge, on different lines. The station called Edenbridge is on the Redhill–Tonbridge branch line (with no direct services from London) and is in the ‘wrong’ part of town for this walk, which starts at Edenbridge Town. This station and Hever are on the Oxted–Uckfield line, which has an hourly off-peak service from London Bridge taking about 40 minutes, although longer on Sundays when you have to change at East Croydon and/or Oxted. Unless you are doing the Figure-of-8 Walk, buy a return to Hever.

If you finish in Edenbridge your ticket is also valid for travel back via Redhill from the town's other station, so you could do this if there were problems on the Uckfield line.

Edenbridge is well served by buses – nine routes call at Edenbridge Town station – but the nature of this walk means that it will nearly always be quicker to head for the nearest station if you want to abandon it.

If driving, the station car park at Edenbridge Town is free at weekends but costs £3.60 Mon–Fri (2019). There is also a free town car park near the church. At Hever there is limited free parking space on the short approach road to the station, and a large privately-owned parking area which costs £2.50 at all times.

Suggested Train

Take the train nearest to 10:00 from London Bridge to Edenbridge Town (a later train would be fine for one of the shorter walks).

Train Times

Lunch

Edenbridge has several pubs in historic buildings on its long straight High Street, after 6½ km on the Main Walk. The suggested lunchtime stop is The Old Eden (01732-862398; food served 12:30–2:30pm Mon–Sat, 4pm Sun) at #121, just past the roundabout with the town's bypass. It consists of several 16thC cottages knocked together and has an attractive beer garden at the rear. There are benches nearby on both sides of the river which would make good picnic spots.

Other pubs on the main part of the High Street near the church are the King & Queen (01732-864479) at #81 and Ye Old Crown Inn (01732-867896) at #74-76, although the latter is now more of a b&b and might only be serving breakfast, not lunch or dinner.

Tea

There are no refreshment places near Hever station, but the walk directions include an optional extension to the King HenryⅧ inn (01732-862457) in Hever village. On the Main Walk you might prefer to stop for tea in Edenbridge when the walk passes through it for a second time.

There are two coffee shops on Edenbridge High Street, as well as the pubs listed above and several fast food places. If you are not in time for The Minstrel at #86 (01732-863100; open to 4pm Tue–Sat, 3pm Mon, closed Sun), there is a branch of Costa Coffee at #64 (01732-866883; open to 6pm Mon–Sat, 5pm Sun) with longer opening hours.

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National Rail: 03457 48 49 50 • Travelline SE (bus times): 0871 200 2233 (12p/min) • TFL (London) : 0343 222 1234

Version

Sep-19

Copyright © Saturday Walkers Club. All Rights Reserved. No commercial use. No copying. No derivatives. Free with attribution for one time non-commercial use only. www.walkingclub.org.uk/site/license.shtml

Walk Directions  

The directions for this walk are also in a PDF (link above) which you can download on to a Kindle, tablet, or smartphone.

Edenbridge Town to Hever

Click the heading below to show/hide the walk route for the selected option(s).

Walk Map: Edenbridge Town to Hever Walk Map

Walk Options

Click on any option to show only the sections making up that route, or the heading above to show all sections.

  1. Main Walk (18 or 21¼ km)
  1. Figure-of-8 Walk (13¾ km)
  2. Short Walk (12¼ or 15½ km)

Walk Directions

Click on any section heading to switch between detailed directions and an outline, or the heading above to switch all sections.

  1. Edenbridge Town Station to the Stone Bridge (¾ km)
  2. Go out along Station Approach and turn left onto Edenbridge High Street. Follow this long straight road through the town to the Stone Bridge across the River Eden.

    Arriving from London, go through the tunnel near the London end of the platform to leave from the other side. Go all the way along Station Approach and turn left at the end onto the High Street. Follow this long straight road through the town to the river (with the opportunity to check out most of the town's lunch and tea places along the way).

    In 300m you pass Costa Coffee on the right, followed by the Eden Valley Museum1 and Ye Old Crown Inn2. At the junction with Church Street the King & Queen pub is on the left, opposite The Minstrel coffee shop. After some fast food shops you finally cross the River Eden3 on a pedestrian footbridge to the left of the Stone Bridge4, the starting point for both the eastern and western loops.

    If you are doing the Short Walk (omitting the eastern loop), go to §5.

  3. The Stone Bridge to the River Eden (2 km)
  4. Head south-east along an embankment on the edge of the water meadows and continue up a slope to meet Hever Road by the entrance to Burnt Oak Farm. Take the track up to the farm buildings and continue on the footpath, crossing the railway. Go along field edges to a cluster of converted farm buildings at Delaware Farm. Turn left onto the footpath heading north, past the houses and back to the river.

    For the eastern loop immediately turn left onto a short concrete path leading onto a low embankment (bund5) on the edge of a water meadow. Continue along the grassy path on top of the embankment as it curves round to the right, ignoring a path ahead across the meadow.

    In 500m go through a wooden kissing gate and keep ahead on a grassy path going gently uphill towards a metal fieldgate 150m away. Make your way around a potentially muddy area in front of this gate and go out through a wooden kissing gate on its right, with Hever Road ahead.

    Do not go out onto the road but bear left onto the driveway to Burnt Oak Farm, which is also a public footpath. Keep ahead past the farm buildings, passing to the right of a large barn. Continue on a grassy path across a small meadow, which leads to a bridge across the Oxted–Uckfield railway line.

    You might just be able to see two stations on this long straight stretch of line: Edenbridge Town is 1 km off to the left, Hever 1¾ km to the right.

    Follow the footpath across the bridge, through a metal kissing gate and down through a thicket into a field. Continue along the grassy field margin, with a ditch and hedge on your right. In the field corner go through another kissing gate and continue in the same direction across a long meadow, with the river off to your left.

    The exit from this meadow is an easily-missed stile in the tree boundary on the right in about 200m, so stay near the right-hand edge. Go over this stile and follow a grassy path diagonally across another meadow, with a cluster of houses ahead on your left. In the far corner go over a stile and along a short path into a gravel parking area.

    This location is shown as Delaware Farm on old OS maps, but the farm buildings have long since been converted into private houses.

    Go across the parking area and turn left onto a driveway, which is also a public footpath. Avoid the entrances to houses on the left and follow the drive as it swings right and left to skirt a large pond, then with woodland on the right and tall garden hedges on the left. After passing the entrance to the last house (The Oast) the footpath becomes an unsurfaced track leading to the River Eden.

  5. The River Eden to Skinners Farm (2½ km)
  6. Keep ahead at footpath junctions to go along field edges towards Medhurst Row. Turn left to go alongside the Redhill–Tonbridge railway line (without crossing it) and follow the footpath heading south-west to Skinners Farm.

    Cross the river on a broad concrete bridge, go through a metal kissing gate and bear right onto a grassy farm track heading N, climbing gently with a few small trees on the left. At the end of the trees ignore a path forking left and keep ahead on a track through a farm field, still climbing. At the top leave the track (which swings right into another farm field) and go through a wooden kissing gate to the right of a metal fieldgate ahead into the corner of a large field.

    Carry on along its right-hand edge, still heading N. Where the hedge turns half-right keep ahead across the field for a further 200m. Go over a stile in the tree boundary and keep left to continue in much the same direction, with a line of trees on your left and a copse on your right.

    At the end of the copse continue along the left-hand edge of a field, directly towards a house. About 75m before reaching it veer left through an easily-missed gap, with a redundant stile confirming that this path in the belt of trees is the right of way. When level with the house turn left through a gap in the trees onto a clear path across a farm field, gradually approaching the Redhill–Tonbridge railway line on a low embankment on the right.

    On the far side ignore a path up to a level crossing and continue along the field margin, with the railway on your right. In the corner go through a metal gate and over a plank footbridge into a meadow. Follow a faint grassy path along its top edge, with the railway now behind a line of trees in a shallow cutting.

    The exit from this meadow is in the far left-hand corner. If you spot a faint grassy path going diagonally down across the meadow you could take it, but the right of way is to carry on along the top edge for about 250m and then veer left by a neglected waymarker post, leaning on the wire fence. At best a faint grassy path will guide you downhill to the left of a clump of trees (concealing a pond) to a fieldgate in the bottom corner.

    Go over a stile beside the gate and keep ahead alongside a line of trees for 175m. Where these end bear right to continue on a long grassy path between hedges. At the far end go through a wooden kissing gate and keep ahead along the left-hand side of a narrow field. Go out through another gate onto a lane by the entrance to some small business units at Skinners Farm.

  7. Skinners Farm to the Stone Bridge (1¼ km)
  8. Go across fields and over the Oxted–Uckfield railway line near Edenbridge Town station. Continue along Churchfield and follow a path through the churchyard. Return to the Stone Bridge via Church Street and the bottom of the High Street.

    Turn right and go along the lane for 50m, then turn left through a wooden kissing gate in the hedge, signposted as a footpath. Follow a faint grassy path across a field to its far right-hand corner, heading SW. Go through a gap into the left-hand of two fields ahead and continue along its right-hand edge.

    As you approach the corner veer right onto any of the short paths through a belt of trees and look for a concealed wooden kissing gate in the undergrowth on the left. Go through this and follow an unsurfaced lane up a slope and over a railway bridge (where you can see Edenbridge Town station on the right).

    At the bottom cross over a residential street (Forge Croft) to continue along the side street just off to the right (Churchfield). At the end of this cul-de-sac take the signposted footpath on the left, a short alleyway which leads into the churchyard. Follow the tarmac path along its northern edge, which later turns half-left along an avenue of lime trees and skirts around the western end of the parish church of Ss Peter and Paul6, which is worth visiting; its entrance is on the south side.

    Go out through the lychgate and continue along Church Street to the town's long straight High Street, with the two alternative lunch pubs nearby: the King & Queen on the left and Ye Old Crown Inn just off to the right. To continue the walk turn left onto the High Street and repeat your outward route across the River Eden by the Stone Bridge. The suggested lunch pub, The Old Eden, is just past the roundabout on the left-hand side of the road.

  9. The Stone Bridge to East Haxted (2½ km)
  10. Take any route through the water meadows between the river and the town's large recreation ground, coming out in the south-eastern corner of the playing fields. Cross Kent Brook and turn right onto a footpath going alongside it, heading west. Follow this path all the way to a footpath T-junction south of East Haxted Farm.

    For the western loop go onto the small patch of grass with the town sign and an information panel about the Water Meadows7, sandwiched between the river and the town's bypass, Mont St Aignan Way8. Go across the river on the modern road bridge (with a fine view back to the Stone Bridge) and cross the bypass carefully at a traffic island. Take the tarmac path back towards the river and bear left by another information panel to go down a slope into the water meadows.

    If the meadows are inundated you could skirt around them on the recreation ground off to the right, but in that case there is likely to be more flooding in the low-lying area further up the valley, making this western loop impracticable.

    In the meadows take the broad grassy path alongside the river (the right-hand path is an alternative, but is one of the suggested return routes). As it approaches a weir the riverside path swings right. Unless you want to detour through the southern part of the meadows, ignore paths off to the left and follow the main path as it heads SW across a semi-open area, eventually going through a belt of trees onto the recreation ground.

    Bear left and go up to a wooden footbridge in the treeline 50m away, where Kent Brook9 flows into the River Eden. Cross the brook and turn right on the other side (the path ahead is the return route). Follow the path along the edge of a copse for 250m, heading W parallel to the brook (hidden in the trees on your right). After the path emerges into open countryside keep ahead alongside the tree-lined brook.

    In 500m keep left at a footpath junction, merging with the recently-rerouted Vanguard Way10 (VGW) from across the brook. In a further 150m the path goes through a narrow gap in a hedge with a rusty iron framework and a warning notice that “Footpath Crosses Taxiway / Airstrip” (so look out for light aircraft taking off and landing at all times in this large area). Walk along a broad grassy strip for 50m and then turn right onto another strip going gently uphill.

    For a short cut you could keep ahead at this junction. This level strip turns half-left after 200m and meets the return route in a further 500m or so. This is not a right of way but local dog-walkers seem to treat this area as Open Access land, and there are no notices insisting that walkers keep to the poorly-waymarked public footpaths. If you take this short cut (saving 2 km), turn left to rejoin the main route and resume the directions at [•] in §7.

    For the main route head W along the grassy strip for 450m, up to a line of trees with a prominent yellow notice about aircraft movement next to a footpath signpost. Turn left at this signpost to go gently downhill along the tree-lined field edge, heading S. At the end of the trees follow the path round to the right past a waymarker post to continue along the right-hand edge of another field, heading W again. In 250m you come to a T-junction with a grassy farm track.

  11. East Haxted to Cernes Farm (1 km)
  12. Turn left and follow the footpath heading south across the River Eden and Eden Brook to Cernes Farm.

    Turn left at the T-junction, heading S underneath power lines (which you can use as a guide for this section). Almost immediately bear left onto a narrow path between high hedges, where the farm track swings right into another field. This potentially overgrown path gradually becomes a little easier and in 250m emerges into a meadow.

    Keep ahead on a faint grassy path, heading for a footbridge with metal handrails 150m away. The footpath takes you across two such bridges in quick succession, the first over the River Eden again and the second over Eden Brook11 (they merge just off to the left).

    Carry on in the same direction across another meadow. On the far side go over a stile and across a plank footbridge into a field. Continue in much the same direction, gradually approaching the left-hand side of this long narrow field. Go through a wide gap in the trees on the far side and continue near the left-hand edge of the next field.

    Go through a gap in the next line of trees and then a small metal gate to continue in the same direction, with Cernes Farm on the left. After passing the farm buildings veer left at a three-way footpath signpost. Go through a metal kissing gate and up to another three-way signpost by a farm track, where you leave the VGW (which turns right).

  13. Cernes Farm to Kent Brook (2¼ km)
  14. Follow the Eden Valley Walk from its starting point, heading north-east across meadows and through Gabriel's Fishery. Continue along the riverbank and across Kent Brook into the recreation ground.

    Although there is nothing here to indicate it, this signpost is the starting point of the Eden Valley Walk12 (EVW). Go straight across the farm track and make your way along the left-hand edge of a field (with no clear path) to the next corner. Go over a stile in the hedge and bear left, following a faint grassy path heading NE across a large field. On the far side go over a stile beside a wooden fieldgate into Gabriel's Fishery13.

    Follow a broad track through this area of woodland and lakes. In 300m go though a wooden gate and keep ahead across a field used by campers, leaving the main track which veers right into a parking area. On the far side cross the River Eden again on a narrow concrete footbridge, emerging into another part of the airstrip. To stay on the published route of the EVW turn right onto a grassy path near the river.

    The EVW follows a loop of the river as it curves round to the left, so after crossing the footbridge you could instead keep ahead on a grassy path which slants across the main airstrip. However, this direct route is clearly inadvisable if there are light aircraft around which might be landing.

    For the main route, simply follow the path near the river as it curves round to the left. Along the way you pass the end of a long taxiway stretching off to the left, from which you would turn left if you had taken the short cut mentioned in §5.

    [•] The main route eventually crosses the main airstrip near a WWⅡ pillbox and rejoins the direct route at a narrow gap in a hedge with another yellow warning notice about aircraft movement. Make your way past a rusty iron framework to leave the airfield and follow a clear grassy path ahead, staying close to a tree-lined stream on your right.

    In 300m the path goes through a copse containing the remains of an overgrown moat, shown as Devil's Den14 on the OS map. The main river is now on your right and you simply follow the riverside path for a further 500m, curving round to the left. After going through a lightly wooded area you meet your outward route at the wooden footbridge over Kent Brook. Go across this into the corner of the recreation ground.

  15. Kent Brook to Church Street (or Town Station) (1 or ¾ km, or 1½ km)
  16. Edenbridge To stay on the EVW, leave the recreation ground on the far side by its car park and go via Coomb Field and Lingfield Road to the High Street. Alternatively, go along the embankment from the far right-hand corner (or take a route through the water meadows) towards the modern road bridge and go up the High Street from the Stone Bridge.

    [•] To complete the Figure-of-8 Walk, head north along the High Street and turn right into Station Approach.


    If you want to stay on the Eden Valley Walk, its published route is described in §8a. However, some more pleasant routes into Edenbridge which might not have been available when the EVW was devised in the 1980s are also given: a direct route in §8b and through the water meadows again in §8c.

    1. The EVW route (1 km)
    2. Edenbridge Go all the way along the right-hand side of the recreation ground, towards a curious iron structure15 on the low embankment (bund5) on the far side. Turn left in front of the embankment and head for a waymarker post by the recreation ground's car park.

      Turn right as indicated and go all the way along a residential street (Coomb Field), then turn right onto Lingfield Road. In 200m go straight across the town's bypass at the traffic lights and continue along the short street opposite to the High Street.

      If you are finishing the walk here you could turn left, where you would pass Costa Coffee on the way to the station.

      For other refreshment places (and to stay on the EVW towards Hever) turn right onto the High Street, soon passing Ye Old Crown Inn and then The Minstrel coffee shop, opposite the King & Queen pub at the junction with Church Street.

    3. Direct route (¾ km)
    4. Climb the embankment and bear right onto a path running along its top. In front of the modern road bridge follow the path round to the left to the town's bypass.

      Cross the main road carefully and take the tarmac path opposite alongside the river. In front of a seating area by the Stone Bridge, take the path on the left up to the High Street. Unless you want to visit The Old Eden (just past the roundabout on the right) turn left and retrace your outward route along the High Street. You soon come to The Minstrel coffee shop opposite the King & Queen pub at the junction with Church Street.

    5. Meadows route (¾ km)
    6. Start along the right-hand side of the recreation ground, then in 50m bear right onto a path through a gap in the trees into the water meadows. As an alternative to retracing your outward route fork right at the first path junction, soon going through a line of trees. Unless you want to detour further into the southern part of the meadows, keep left and stay on the main grassy path as it gradually curves round to the left.

      In 200m keep ahead at a main crosspaths (crossing over the suggested outward route in §5, which started along the riverside path) and continue through a lightly wooded area. In a further 300m the path merges with the riverside path in front of the modern road bridge. Veer left up the slope and continue along a short path to the town's bypass.


    If you are finishing the walk here, follow the directions below (the reverse of the outward route in §1).

    • Finishing at Edenbridge Town Station (1½ km)
    • To complete the Figure-of-8 Walk from any of the above routes into the town, head N along the High Street. From the junction with Church Street you would pass Ye Old Crown Inn and later Costa Coffee, both on the left-hand side. After going over a small rise, and just before the road bends left towards traffic lights, Edenbridge Town station is signposted to the right.

      The town's other station (on the Redhill–Tonbridge line) is 1 km further away on the long straight road ahead, the B2026.

      To finish at Edenbridge Town turn right into Station Approach and go all the way along it to the station. Platform 1 on the near side is for trains to London; if the ticket office is closed, the entrance is on the right.

  17. Church Street to the River Eden (2¼ km)
  18. Follow the Eden Valley Walk (EVW) through the churchyard to Churchfield. Go along this cul-de-sac and across Forge Croft onto a lane over the railway line. Continue along the left-hand edge of a field and turn right in the corner to head east across several fields. Follow the footpath up a small rise and then fork right onto a path slanting down the hillside. In the bottom field corner turn right onto a farm track leading down to the River Eden.

    The route to Hever station is entirely on the Eden Valley Walk (EVW). There are two overlaps with parts of the eastern loop (in reverse): the first 800m and later a 500m stretch across the River Eden and through Delaware Farm.

    From the High Street head E along Church Street, towards the church. Go through its lychgate and turn left to follow a tarmac path past the church tower and along an avenue of lime trees. Continue along the north side of the churchyard to the far end and leave through a gate on the left. Go along a short alleyway to the end of a cul-de-sac (Churchfield) and follow this out to a T-junction with another residential street (Forge Croft).

    Cross over Forge Croft (slightly to the right) and go up an unsurfaced lane which curves round to the right and crosses over the Oxted–Uckfield railway line. At the bottom of the slope go through a wooden kissing gate and veer right onto any of the short paths through a belt of trees into the corner of a field. Go along its left-hand edge to a gap in the next corner, where there is a waymarker post.

    Do not go through the gap but turn right along the field edge, staying on the EVW and leaving the eastern loop. In the next corner go over a stile by a large oak tree and continue along the left-hand edge of another field. At the end cross a ditch on a footbridge and keep ahead across the next field, with farm buildings away to your left and a meander of the River Eden not far off to the right; later with a wire fence on your left.

    At the far end cross another ditch and go through a gate in the hedge. Bear slightly right to follow a faint grassy path climbing gently up the next field, passing to the right of a clump of trees concealing a pond. At the top go through a metal fieldgate and take the right-hand of two footpaths ahead, a clear path slanting down across a field.

    The path gradually approaches a hedge along the bottom of the field and comes to a path junction in the corner. At the corner turn right onto a grassy farm track going gently downhill, with a few small trees on the right. At the bottom go through a metal kissing gate and cross the River Eden on a broad concrete bridge.

  19. The River Eden to Lydens Barn (1½ km)
  20. Cross the river and follow a long driveway past the houses at Delaware Farm out to Hever Road. Cross the road onto the signposted footpath opposite, which turns right briefly and then leads into a field. Take the left-hand of two footpaths, slanting across the field and continuing under the railway line to Lydens Lane. Turn right and go along the lane for 300m to Lydens Barn.

    Continue along a track (which soon becomes a surfaced driveway) with woodland on the left and tall garden hedges shielding the houses on the right. Follow the drive as it swings right and left past a large pond, then (leaving the eastern loop) all the way out to Hever Road.

    Cross the road carefully and turn right onto the signposted footpath, a narrow fenced path established to avoid 75m of awkward road walking. At the end go through a metal gate (opposite the original way in from the road) into a large field. The Oxted–Uckfield railway line is on a high embankment on the far side, and waymarkers indicate two footpaths across the field.

    Do not take the faint grassy path heading directly towards the embankment (this footpath might in any case still be closed for repairs to the steps) but turn half-left to head S across the field. There is no clear path but a neglected waymarker post leaning on the boundary fence 150m away indicates the right of way.

    On the far side turn left to go along the field edge. About 100m before the field corner turn right through a metal gate in the fence and follow a path under a high brick bridge carrying the railway line. This leads into a field where you turn half-left across it (again with no clear path), skirting a pond on your right along the way.

    On the far side make your way past a vehicle barrier and turn right onto a minor road (Lydens Lane), taking care as there is no pavement. Go along this quiet lane for 300m, ignoring the driveway to Oast Farm on the left, to reach a converted oast house.

  21. Lydens Barn to Hever Station (1 or 4¼ km)
  22. Turn left and follow the footpath past the barn conversion and farm buildings into a field. Turn left along its edge and continue towards the right-hand end of a copse. Turn right and head for a gate in the far corner. Go out along a short path and (if finishing here) double back along a short path sloping down to the station platform.

    For the extension via Hever village, carry on along the EVW to Hever Lane. Turn left onto the road, cross over the railway and keep ahead at a T-junction on a footpath leading to Hever Road. Turn right onto the road and follow it into Hever village. For a different return route, head south on a footpath past Hever Primary School, then turn right onto Rectory Lane and continue along Uckfield Lane and Hever Lane to the station.

    At the Oast House turn left off the lane into the driveway to Lydens Barn (signposted as a public footpath) and keep to the left. In front of a garage block veer right as indicated by a footpath waymarker to go past the side of the large barn conversion, then turn left onto a gravel path.

    Leave the property through a small wooden gate. At the end of a short grassy path turn right onto a farm track, passing to the right of some outbuildings. Go through a new side gate to the left of a metal fieldgate and turn left along the edge of a field, with glimpses of a large pond behind the trees on your left. Go over a stile next to another fieldgate to continue along the edge of another large field.

    Your eventual exit from this field is in its far right-hand corner, but at the end of the line of trees you are expected to keep ahead towards the right-hand end of a copse, 150m away. An inconspicuous waymarker post there directs you to turn right and make for the corner 200m away, gradually approaching the left-hand field edge (with the platforms of Hever station visible beyond it).

    In the field corner go through a metal kissing gate onto a narrow path through some undergrowth, which soon comes to a path junction with a waymarker post. Unless you want to continue along the EVW to the pub in Hever village, turn sharp left (almost doubling back) onto a short path sloping down to Platform 1, for trains to London.

    • Extension via Hever village (+3¼ km)
    • Keep ahead on the narrow path and its continuation along a driveway, going through a wooden fieldgate along the way. At the end turn left onto a minor road (Hever Lane) and go over the railway bridge to a T-junction. Take the signposted footpath opposite, a fenced path to the right of a couple of driveways. After going over a stile the path continues between the attractive Chippens Bank House16 and its ornamental lake.

      At the end go through a wooden kissing gate and turn right onto Hever Road; you will be walking along this fairly busy road for 500m and need to take care as there is no pavement. In 50m turn left to stay on Hever Road (the road ahead is Uckfield Lane). Follow this round a right-hand bend and up a slope into Hever village, coming to the King HenryⅧ inn at a sharp left-hand bend.

      If you have time before returning to Hever station, St Peter's church17 is directly ahead and worth a visit. The entrance to Hever Castle18 is along the road to the left, but this major tourist attraction is not visible from outside the grounds.

      The suggested route back to Hever station is 250m longer than the outward route, but is mostly on quiet lanes with little traffic. Leave the EVW by taking the signposted footpath on the outside of the bend, a driveway heading S past Hever Primary School. Continue on a path which leads to a minor road (Rectory Lane).

      Turn right onto Rectory Lane and follow it for 450m to a T-junction. Turn left and go along a road (Uckfield Lane) for 150m, then turn right into Hever Lane. In 400m keep ahead at a junction (crossing over your outward route). In a further 250m turn left into the station approach road. Cross the footbridge to Platform 1 for trains to London.

Walk Notes
  1. The Eden Valley Museum is a local history museum in a GradeⅡ* listed medieval building on Edenbridge High Street, originally Doggett's Farmhouse but now called Church House. One of its exhibits (a needlework box made by a German POW in WWⅡ) featured in the BBC's “A History of the World in 100 Objects”.
  2. Ye Old Crown Inn dates from the 14thC and has an unusual bridging sign, spanning the High Street. This coaching inn was a haunt of the Ranslye Gang, a notorious band of smugglers in the early 19thC.
  3. The source of the River Eden is in the Titsey Estate, on the slopes of the North Downs near Oxted. It is one of the main tributaries of the River Medway, joining it near Penshurst.
  4. The single-arch Stone Bridge was built in 1836, replacing an earlier six-arch bridge. The Great Stone Bridge Trust was established in the 16thC to pay for twelve Bridge Wardens and provide funds for repairs. Its funds are now used for the benefit of Edenbridge generally.
  5. A bund is a man-made embankment, in this case part of the town's flood defences.
  6. Ss Peter & Paul, Edenbridge was rebuilt and extended in the 13thC and there is little trace of an earlier Norman church. It contains a set of stained glass windows by the Pre-Raphaelite artist Burne-Jones in the east wall, some fine memorials and a poignant tombstone to Ann Jemett. The tower clock has an hour hand only.
  7. Edenbridge Water Meadows were taken under the control of the Great Stone Bridge Trust in 2015. The 16 acres are actively managed for the benefit of wildlife, with visitors being asked to stay on the mown paths.
  8. Edenbridge is twinned with Mont-Saint-Aignan in France, hence the name of the town's bypass.
  9. Kent Brook is a minor tributary of the River Eden. Its source is in the Greensand Hills near Limpsfield Chart and it forms the county boundary between Surrey and Kent for part of its length.
  10. The Vanguard Way runs for 105 km “from the suburbs to the sea”, from Croydon in south London to Newhaven in East Sussex. The new section between Troy Town and Cernes Farm replaces the original route via Haxted Mill, which included an awkward stretch along Dwelly Lane.
  11. Eden Brook is one of the three main tributaries of the River Eden, with a strong enough flow to be mistaken for the main river (it powered watermills at Felbridge and Lingfield). Its source is in the High Weald near East Grinstead.
  12. The Eden Valley Walk runs for 24 km, linking the Vanguard Way with the Wealdway and the Medway Valley Walk in Tonbridge. There are few rights of way alongside the River Eden itself and from Penshurst much of the route actually follows the River Medway.
  13. Gabriel's Fishery was created in the early 20thC, transforming some arable farmland into an area of lakes and surrounding woodland.
  14. Devil's Den was a medieval name for earthworks of unknown origin (as was Devil's Highway for Roman roads whose origins had been forgotten). There is no trace of a farmstead which might have existed on this site.
  15. The iron structure was apparently made to help the town's tug-of-war team practice.
  16. Chippens Bank House is a 16thC timber-framed house, much modernised and extended. From 1949-80 it was owned by the Everest Trust, a charity set up so that ‘worthy people could have a holiday somewhere’. More recent private owners have included a UK fly-fishing champion, who constructed the lake and stocked it with trout.
  17. St Peter, Hever dates from the 13thC, but the church was completely refitted in 1894. Its north-eastern chapel contains the very worn Purbeck marble tomb-chest of Sir Thomas Bullen (Anne Boleyn's father), and there is a fine brass of Margaret Cheyne (d.1419) in the raised chancel.
  18. Hever Castle was the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, the ill-fated second wife of HenryⅧ. It was later bestowed upon his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. The castle was restored in the early 20thC by William Waldorf Astor and is now a popular tourist attraction, with some spectacular gardens.

» Last updated: September 18, 2019

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