Tring Circular walk

The Chilterns: An open ridge walk to Ivinghoe Beacon, gentle forests, and a classic village pub for tea.

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  • Tring Circular. 8/9/21
    amib, Sep-21

    This 11.8 mile version of this walk is probably the best walk this walker has undertaken during Covid times and is an update to the 2010 video. The weather was good, with a cooling easterly breeze (some sound interference), and there was variety. The only slight downside is being in the flight path of Luton airport, even now, with few flights. Setting out from St Peter and St Paul church, Little Gaddesden, the walker follows an anti-clockwise direction through mixed woodland, joining the Icknield Way Trail en route, to reach the 757 foot high Ivinghoe Beacon. There are some fine views to be had, on a good day. A picnic lunch is taken at the quieter Gallows Hill, nearby. Thereafter, The Ridgeway path takes the walker through open downland, via Pitstone Hill, to the wooded nature reserve at Aldbury Nowers. Shortly after that, it's on to the Hertfordshire Way and more open country for the walk into Aldbury. The walker then ascends back into the Ashridge woodland, passes the National Trust cafe and visitor centre, and the Moneybury Hill bell barrow. The finale is more mixed woodland and a golf course before arriving back at the start. A great walking area, at any time of the year, and highly recommended!

  • IVINGHOE BEACON CIRCULAR WALK NEAR LONDON England | HIKING UK
    Hiking In London, Oct-18

    Tring Circular walk Next event: http://www.senderismoenlondres.co.uk/events.html The Chilterns: An open ridge walk to Ivinghoe Beacon, gentle forests, and a classic village pub for tea. An open ridge walk to Ivinghoe Beacon, gentle forests, and a classic village. This route - following the Ridgeway along the Chiltern escarpment to Ivinghoe Beacon - is exhilarating, offering downland scenery as fine as anything on the South Downs. From the Beacon itself, it seems as if you can see half of England on a fine day. Photos event: https://www.flickr.com/groups/ivinghoe_beacon/ Distance: 16 km Grading: Medium Rating: 5 out of 10 Ascent: 360m Hiking time: About 5 to 6 hours of actual hiking See more: https://www.walkingclub.org.uk/walk/tring-circular/index.html Event: http://www.senderismoenlondres.co.uk/events/ivinghoe-beacon-circular-walk.html Sponsor the club If you arrived to this page is because you are interested in our Club and what we are doing. Probably we share the same values, we love nature and the freedom of walking through the country side. Even more, you might want to collaborate with us to help us improve and replace our hiking equipment. If so, please proceed with a donation subscription, you choose the amount and you can cancel at any time. Feel proud to be part of this big community!! In return, in the case you have a company, we can include your logo on our website, videos...etc Let's growth together!! https://www.patreon.com/hikinginlondon ¡SUBSCRIBE! Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/senderismoenlondres Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hikinginlondon/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hikinginlondon/ © Club Hiking in London. Ltd 2020 (CASC) in collaboration with Saturday Walkers Club. swcwalks book2 walk5 #HikingUK #HikinginLondon #Ivinghoe

  • TRING Circular Hiking | Top 10 walks in South East England | WALK UK
    Hiking In London, Jun-16

    Tring Circular walk The Chilterns: An open ridge walk to Ivinghoe Beacon, gentle forests, and a classic village pub for tea. The 137km (85 mile) Ridgeway is supposed to be the oldest long distance footpath in England. Linking Ivinghoe Beacon with Avebury in Wiltshire, it is a route that has been in use for at least 5000 years. It is part of a track that originally stretched from the Wash in Norfolk to the Dorset Coast, and was used in more recent times by livestock drovers. Until the Enclosure Acts of the mid eighteenth century, the Ridgeway was a series of tracks on the crest of the downs, much as it still is today between Pitstone Hill and Ivinghoe Beacon. There is a map set in stone on the top of the Beacon that details the whole route The most famous owner of the Ashridge Estate, across which much of the afternoon section of this walk passes,was Francis, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. Known as the "Canal Duke", his pioneering work in the sector is commemorated in the Bridgewater Monument, erected in 1832 and next to the first tea stop on this walk. You can climb the monument for a small fee from 1pm to 5pm April to October weekends and bank holidays for fine views over the countryside: ask in the tea kiosk opposite to get access if the tower is not open during these hours (it depends on how many volunteers the Trust has available on any given day). In 1759 Bridgewater employed engineer James Brindley to build a canal from Manchester to Worsley, Lancashire, one his other estates, to transport coal from his mines there. Brindley's innovation - a technique called "puddling" - enabled the canal to travel in an aqueduct across the Irwell River valley. The aqueduct became the wonder of the age, and sparked a canal building boom that lasted till the advent of the railways in the 1830s. Bridgewater himself is buried in Little Gaddesden Church. Ashridge House, which is situated at the other end of the grand avenue leading up to the monument, is now a well known business school. The grounds are owned by the National Trust. Aldbury seems such a quintessentially typical English village that is hard to believe it is not a film set, and indeed has been used for this purpose on several occasions. With a pond, church, pub, post office, sundial and even a set of village stocks, it seems to have everything a village should have. Its population, 675 people in 1831, was said to have been swelled by the influx of workmen to build the nearby Tring Cutting, a major engineering feat of the early Victorian era, which allowed the London to Birmingham Railway, the first long distance railway line to reach London, to be built. Berkhamsted (reached on the extension to the main walk) was the childhood home of writer Graham Greene, whose father was the headmaster of Berkhamsted School. Berkhamsted Castle (tel 01375 858486), next to the railway station, is a classic Norman motte and bailey castle, built by Robert, Count of Mortain, the half brother of William the Conqueror. Thomas a Becket, Henry II's chancellor and later martyred when archbishop of Canterbury, lived here from 1155 to 1165. There is not much to see, just a few ruined walls, but entrance is free, and if you have just missed a train at Berkhamsted, it is worth a quick look. The castle is open until 4pm in winter and 6pm in summer. Event: http://www.senderismoenlondres.co.uk/events.html Sponsor the club If you arrived to this page is because you are interested in our Club and what we are doing. Probably we share the same values, we love nature and the freedom of walking through the country side. Even more, you might want to collaborate with us to help us improve and replace our hiking equipment. If so, please proceed with a donation subscription, you choose the amount and you can cancel at any time. Feel proud to be part of this big community!! In return, in the case you have a company, we can include your logo on our website, videos...etc Let's growth together!! https://www.patreon.com/hikinginlondon ¡SUBSCRIBE! Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/senderismoenlondres Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hikinginlondon/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hikinginlondon/ © Club Hiking in London. Ltd 2020 (CASC) in collaboration with Saturday Walkers Club. walk5 swcwalks book2 #HikingUK #HikinginLondon #Tring

  • Tring to Berkhampstead, Part 1. 6/12/10.
    amib, Dec-10

    A delightful (even in the freezing fog!) 12.5 mile (per my pedometer) walk through the hills and woods of this Hertfordshire/Bedfordshire section of the Ridgeway. Part 1 concludes with lunch on a very foggy Ivinghoe Beacon.

  • Tring to Berkhampstead, Part 2. 6/12/10.
    amib, Dec-10

    Continuing on after lunch, this walk then takes the short cut through Ashridge Estate woodland to the Bridgewater Monument and the National Trust cafe. Then the walker takes the new 'bluebell variation and shortcut' through more woodland on Berkhampstead Common before descending across fields into Berkhampstead.