Saturday Walkers Club www.walkingclub.org.uk
Even Giants Rest after Giant Steps!

Even Giants Rest after Giant Steps!

Lunch stop Wilmington, prior to ascending the South Downs. D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Sep-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 1

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 1

Long Man, short sheep. 17 February '07

17-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 2

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 2

...a waste of a good walk. 17 February '07

17-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Walk from Berwick to Eastbourne

Walk from Berwick to Eastbourne

View of South Downs.Taken near Wilmington, Sussex. D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Mar-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Walking to the Long Man....

Walking to the Long Man....

....of Wilmington. Berwick to Eastbourne

06-Jul-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Bee and butterfly window

Bee and butterfly window

Wilmington church ... Berwick to Eastbourne

06-Jul-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 3

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 3

The man, 7 July '07

07-Jul-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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A reservoir, then the South Downs Way past pretty villages (Jevington and Wilmington) and a ridge walk.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 27 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 12 miles (21 km)

This South Downs walk heads from inland Sussex to the coast, taking in a variety of scenery along the way. From Berwick the walk cuts across to the peaceful birdwatchers’ paradise of Arlington Reservoir before crossing farmland towards Wilmington, then ascends to the huge chalk figure of the Long Man. From here the route continues to the historic smuggling village of Jevington, then ascends the South Downs to follow ridges of chalk grassland with views in all directions, before descending to the seaside resort of Eastbourne and the possibility of extending the walk to the dramatic heights of Beachy Head.

Note that this walk involves one busy road crossing (A27) at Wilmington.

Full Details

Catkins

Catkins

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree

Tree

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Reeds

Reeds

...bravely poking up through the ash Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The giant appears

The giant appears

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Road to Wilmington Church

Road to Wilmington Church

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The Wilmington Yew

The Wilmington Yew

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The South Downs : Windover and 'High and Over' Hills, and picturesque Alfriston. Can be extended with a chalk cliff coastal walk to Seaford.

East Sussex SWC Walk 90 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 8 miles (14 km)

This walk looks at territory familiar from other Saturday Walkers Club walks from unfamiliar angles, using entirely new paths to link Berwick, Wilmington, Alfriston and Exceat (pronounced Ex-seet, though Ex-ee-at is a widespread mispronunciation).

The highlights are climbs up two of the most beautiful hills in the South Downs, both of them affording panoramic views. The first of these is Windover Hill behind Wilmington, on which is found the chalk figure of the Long Man of Wilmington – seen at close quarters on this walk. The second is High and Over, a dramatic vantage point above the Cuckmere River, with views down towards Cuckmere Haven and the sea.

Before and between these two hills are two fairly flat sections – one approaching the South Downs ridge from the north, and the other along the pretty valley of the Cuckmere River south of Alfriston. Both Wilmington and Alfriston have wonderful pubs for lunch, though in the latter village you may prefer to sample one of its two tea rooms. An alternative start from Berwick also takes in a popular pub in the village of Alciston and another near Berwick church, which was decorated by members of the Bloomsbury Group.

The walk ends at the Cuckmere Inn by Exceat Bridge, from where there are very regular buses back to Seaford - or you can walk to Seaford via Cuckmere Haven and the over the cliffs of Seaford Head, a beautiful 6km (3.7 miles) extension, with stunning backward views of the chalk cliffs of the Seven Sisters. Alternatively if you are feeling energetic you can walk over the Seven Sisters to Birling Gap and East Dean.

Note that this walk is perfectly practical in winter – the lowland areas can be muddy, but no more so than anywhere else. However, it is worth noting that from October to March the sun shines into your eyes more or less constantly from Berwick to Exceat – perhaps not a great hardship if the weather has otherwise been grey and bleak.

Full Details

Burgess Hill to Hassocks

Burgess Hill to Hassocks

View of water tower from path over railway near Burgess Hill. D.Allen Vivitar 5199 5mp

01-Jan-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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South Downs from Park Barn Farm on the Sussex Border Path on the Burgess Hill to Hassocks (extra) walk 108

South Downs from Park Barn Farm on the Sussex Border Path on the Burgess Hill to Hassocks (extra) walk 108

Mud to die for on the SBP between Ditchling & the South Downs. D. Allen Vivitar 5199 3 March 2007

01-Jan-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Burgess Hill to Hassocks - Sussex Border Path

Burgess Hill to Hassocks - Sussex Border Path

View from top of the South Downs towards Indian War Memorial (just over the horizon as you follow the line of trees along the Sussex Border Path). D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Jun-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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The Hassocks PH

The Hassocks PH

Hassocks, West Sussex

01-Jun-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club Book 3 (extra) walk 108 - Burgess Hill to Hassocks: The Bull Inn & The Post Office Ditchling Sussex

Saturday Walkers Club Book 3 (extra) walk 108 - Burgess Hill to Hassocks: The Bull Inn & The Post Office Ditchling Sussex

The Sussex Border Path is an integral part of the Burgess Hill to Hassocks walk (via the South Downs) that goes through the charming village of Ditchling. As of May 2015 the building far left on the corner is now a cafe! D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

03-Mar-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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South Downs ascent

South Downs ascent

It's That Man Again! Ascending the South Downs on the Sussex Border Path near Ditchling Beacon. Photo By D.Allen Vivitar 5 mp

01-May-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Hurstpierpoint

Hurstpierpoint

Hurstpierpoint College and Chapel West Sussex. D.Allen vivitar 5199mp

02-Jul-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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A long almost circular walk via the Sussex Border Path, Sussex Villages, and the South Downs Way ridge from Ditchling Beacon to Wolstonbury Hill

East Sussex SWC Walk 108 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 16 miles (27 km)

This walk takes in Sussex landmarks including three windmills, two golf courses, ponds, a water tower, picturesque villages and The Sussex Downs with panoramic views of surrounding countryside and the South coast. Initially following the railway track south towards Hassocks, the walk goes east through a local rural park area and climbs up to a distinctive water tower visible for miles around. Continuing on with constant views of the Downs to the south, passing stables, farms etc, it joins the Sussex Border Path, which divides east and west Sussex, and travels south towards Ditchling (the recommended lunch stop for the short walk, and a possible early lunch stop for the main walk). Later, the path steeply ascends near Ditchling Beacon. After a descent for lunch at the Plough at Pyecombe, there is a gentler climb up Wolstonbury Hill. There follows a descent to Hurstpierpoint (and its College); the route almost coming full circle -just skirting Burgess Hill on the way to Hassocks.

Full Details

Nets

Nets

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Eastbourne Welcome

Eastbourne Welcome

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Pickled

Pickled

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Sausages

Sausages

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Can has cod

Can has cod

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Purple poppy

Purple poppy

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Lifeguards

Lifeguards

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Coastal walk via Eastbourne's promenade, Beachy Head and the 7 Sisters, then inland over the downs to East Dean. Return by bus.

East Sussex SWC Walk 60 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 7 miles (12 km)

You start this walk along Eastbourne’s pleasant seafront, and then follow the coast into a hidden valley (with fine downland flowers and butterflies in summer), from where it is a steep climb up onto Beachy Head for lunch. The next stretch is one of the great classic coastal walks, a rolling descent along chalk cliffs down to Birling Gap for tea. From there, you have a gentle climb inland, with fine sea and downland views, to the village of East Dean, where there are further refreshment options, and frequent buses back to Eastbourne.

Full Details

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 1

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 1

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 2

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 2

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 3

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 3

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 4

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 4

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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drama in the sky

drama in the sky

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

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by the way

by the way

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

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near glynde

near glynde

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

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The best walk in the book! A South Downs ridge, picture postcard Alfriston, Cuckmere Haven (beach), and cliffs with views of the Seven Sisters. Long but worth it.

East Sussex TOCW Book 1, Walk 31 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 14 miles (23 km)

Everyone's favourite walk in the book. It starts with a South Downs Ridge walk. Lunch is in the picturesque village of Alfriston. After lunch there is Cuckmere Haven (a pretty river valley), and a coastal cliff walk into Seaford. You can swim at Cuckmere Haven or Seaford.

Near the start, the route goes through Firle Park and then follows the South Downs Way for much of the day, with not as much climbing as Walk 25's arduous route into Hastings, and with marvellous views across the lush valleys to the north and down to the sea. There are three lovely villages to enjoy during the course of the day, all with open churches: West Firle, West Dean, and (the suggested lunchstop) the old smuggling village of Alfriston, which likes to call its church a cathedral.

There is slightly further to walk after lunch than before it. From Alfriston the route follows the riverbank through the Cuckmere Valley and through Friston Forest down to Exceat, an extinct village on the edge of the Seven Sisters Country Park, where there is a Visitors’ Centre. The Vanguard Way then leads through the Seaford Head Nature Reserve – hoopoe, bluethroat and wryneck have been seen here – to the beach at Cuckmere Haven. This is in season a good enough place to take a dip or just to enjoy a front-stalls view of the white cliffs of the Seven Sisters.

Finally there is a walk along the coastal path and down into Seaford, a seaside town with a long esplanade and reconstructed shingle beach.

Full Details

Manicured footpath

Manicured footpath

Not many footpaths have their own lawn and neatly clipped hedges Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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In a wood

In a wood

Ive discovered a new toy...the "fireworks" setting. Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Woodland Path

Woodland Path

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree in a wood

Tree in a wood

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Gate out of the wood

Gate out of the wood

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Gate out of a wood...

Gate out of a wood...

....into a lime green sea, Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Trees

Trees

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Over the South Downs to Brighton, the liveliest city on the South Coast

East Sussex SWC Walk 50 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 12 miles (20 km)

Different from walking the South Downs ridge, this route traverses north to south exploring hidden valleys, woods, open access and park land. The goal is the lively town of Brighton and the sea but first you will pass through the pretty village of Ditchling, walk over Ditchling Beacon, through Stanmer Park and the University of Sussex to Falmer, the only pub stop on the walk. There is a natural breaking off point at Falmer but those who persevere walking towards Brighton will be rewarded with a lovely view of the sea from kemp town Racecourse and an easy path into Brighton. The boardwalk, pier, seafront bars, Mediterranean cuisine, fish and chips or oysters and champagne and the Lanes await you.

For the walk, you need OS Explorer Map 122 and preferably a compass. It is advisable to take plenty of water and some food as the only available refreshments, apart from the Deli at Ditchling Village some 2.5 kms into the walk, is a small café at Stanmer and the Swan Inn at Falmer is some 12 kms and 3.5 to 4 hours into the walk. The Swan stops taking orders for food at 2pm. (Possibly 2:30 if you ring the landlord Tel: 01273 681842).

Full Details

SDC11066

SDC11066

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11067

SDC11067

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11068

SDC11068

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11069

SDC11069

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11070

SDC11070

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11071

SDC11071

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

SDC11072

SDC11072

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

An energetic walk over the South Downs with great views, 3 hills, 3 pubs, and a ridge.

East Sussex SWC Walk 47 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 14 miles (24 km)

This is an energetic walk (550 metres or 1,600 feet of ascent) over three distinct downland ridges, with magnificent views throughout. One of the pleasures of the walk is that the entire route is in view for much of the walk, so you can look back at the terrain you have already done or ahead to the delights to come. Navigation is easy, the walking is over wide and distinct paths, and while there are three substantial climbs, most of the walk is flat, gently undulating or downhill.

As well as plenty of grand downland walking, the route includes a start and finish in historic Lewes, quaint corners of which you see both at the start and end of the walk, an optional detour to Mount Caburn (Iron Age fort) with its dramatic viewpoint of the whole circuit, and the pleasant small village of Glynde. You also pass the remote station of Southease, with its YHA cafe nearby.

The walk passes 3 good pubs, and 3 train stations on the way (between the 3 hills, so if you want to drop out, its quite easy). You can do the walk either clockwise or anticlockwise, and directions are given for both in the attached pdf

Full Details

View from the Downs

View from the Downs

28-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Detail, garden of Southover House

Detail, garden of Southover House

28-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 1

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 1

Hanging, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 2

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 2

26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 3

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 3

The Horseshoe Machine, Rodmell, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 4

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 4

Church, Southease, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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South Downs Way along a chalk ridge in the morning, remote Rodmell for lunch, then back up and over the downs to the coast. Undercliff path, or bus to Brighton

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 24 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 9 miles (16 km)

This fine South Downs walk follows ridges of chalk grassland offering panoramic views in all directions. It begins in the historic town of Lewes, then the route quickly rises to follow a ridge along the top of the Downs before descending for lunch to the picturesque and historic village of Rodmell with its literary associations. In the afternoon it gently climbs back over the Downs to the sea to emerge at the town of Saltdean, with the option to continue for a further 8.5 km to Brighton.

Walk options: The directions for the following variations appear at the end of the main walk text. (see p260).

a) Alternative return to Lewes via Northease Manor: This route, which is lower-lying than the main walk route, takes you inland via Northease Manor. You follow the main walk directions to point [5], then follow the directions for this option at the end of the main walk text.

b) Shorter walk ending at Southease: You can reduce the length of the walk to 12.5km (7.8 miles) by ending at Southease and returning by train to Lewes from there. Follow the main walk directions until point [5], then follow the directions at the end of the main walk text.

c) Lewes to Seaford walk (via South Downs): For the ultimate, invigorating long walk (24.8km/15.4 miles) from Lewes to Seaford, you can take the short walk option (b) above, ending at Southease station, then take the separate Southease to Seaford (walk 26, option (a) in this book) which starts at Southease station.

An option of this walk to Brighton via Rottingdean is available on the website of the Saturday Walkers’ Club www.walkingclub.org.uk

Both these options use the fine downland start of the main walk, which climbs from Lewes to the South Downs ridge, with magnificent views across the plains of the river Ouse.

Full Details

The trig point on the downs near Southease

The trig point on the downs near Southease

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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The South Downs

The South Downs

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Downs view

Downs view

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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From second half of Lewes via West Firle, looking back to first half

From second half of Lewes via West Firle, looking back to first half

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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West Firle

West Firle

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Old Forge in Glynde

Old Forge in Glynde

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Hill near the start

Hill near the start

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Long. A steep hill (views) to Glynde. Lunch in quiet West Firle, then the South Downs Way (chalk ridge), with a flat valley walk back to historic Lewes

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 25 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 14 miles (23 km)

Each of the three sections of this walk makes a fine walk in itself. Put together, they make a grand day's circuit in stunning scenery.The main walk starts in the historic town of Lewes with the early section having fine views over the town and castle. After reaching a secluded valley, skylarks can often to be heard whilst hovering in the sky. The mid section along the South Downs Way offers extensive views both inland and towards the port of Newhaven with the Channel beyond. The final stretch re-enters Lewes along the levee beside the River Ouse.

The walk has 360 metres of ascent spread over three steepish hills, but in between there are long sections which are mainly level. The main walk is not well suited to December and January due to the limited daylight.

Full Details

Book 2, Walk 28, Seaford to Eastbourne

Book 2, Walk 28, Seaford to Eastbourne

Seven Sisters, 28 March 2005

27-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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S4300038

S4300038

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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S4300031

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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S4300032

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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S4300033

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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S4300036

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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S4300040

02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

The best walk in the Southeast! A dramatic cliff walk passing Cuckemere Haven, the Seven Sisters and Beachy Head as the South Downs meets the sea. Ends with Eastbourne's promenade and pier.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 28 • Toughness: 9/10 • Length: 13 miles (22 km)

This classic cliff-top walk – one of the finest coastal walks in England – affords stunning (and very famous) views of the white cliffs of the Seven Sisters, and the renowned Beachy Head, before ending in the elegant seafront town of Eastbourne. There is quite a lot of climbing and descending on the walk – indeed, apart from the section around Cuckmere Haven and the finish along the Eastbourne seafront, almost none of the route is flat – but somehow in the grandeur of the scenery the effort is not noticed.

In summer, the walk also offers numerous opportunities for a dip in the sea: which is best will depend on the tide. Seaford and Eastbourne beaches can be swum at any state of the tide. At Cuckmere Haven and Birling Gap, however, there are awkward underwater rocks that are well covered at high water and exposed when the tide is out, but covered by shallow sea for a period in between; nonetheless, if you catch these beaches at the right time, they make a wonderfully scenic place for a dip.

Take care near the cliff edges on this walk, as they are crumbly and liable to collapse: the official advice is to keep 5 metres from any cliff edge (advice regularly ignored by summer tourist: but don’t copy them!).

Full Details

Sheep at trig. point next to dried out pond on South Downs Way

Sheep at trig. point next to dried out pond on South Downs Way

above Ouse Valley

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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One trig. point, two sheep

One trig. point, two sheep

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Hangliders awaiting wind

Hangliders awaiting wind

SDW near Mill Mound

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Sheep near radio masts

Sheep near radio masts

on South Downs Way

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Radio Masts Beddingham Hill

Radio Masts Beddingham Hill

South Downs Way

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Paragliders at Firle Bostal

Paragliders at Firle Bostal

along the South Downs Way, East Sussex

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Looking back along the SDW

Looking back along the SDW

near Firle Bostal

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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2 Long Ridge walks over open downs, beautiful Alfriston for lunch, and Eastbourne pier and prom. to finish.

East Sussex SWC Walk 25 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 16 miles (27 km)

This walk along the South Downs Way (SDW) consists of 2 spectacular ridge walks with a picturesque village in the middle for lunch and Eastbourne promenade, beach and pier to finish. Its a long (so summer only) but very rewarding walk. The route is well waymarked, the paths are easy walking, and the route is easy to follow. The South Downs are treeless and open, so there are good views throughout.

The walk starts in Southease, right on the SDW, and climbs the first ridge straight away, up to Firle Beacon. There is an alternate start in Glynde in case the trains to Southease don't line up.

At the end of ridge is Alfriston, a pretty village in a pretty valley with a village green dominated by a large church. 2 good pubs and a village shop to choose from for lunch.

After lunch, follow the northern leg of the SDW up and over Wilmington Hill to Jevington (pub) before a final climb to head south along another ridge towards the coast.

Rather than follow the offical SDW route downhill, continue on to the coast, then follow the 'other' leg of the SDW down in to Eastbourne. Follow the prom for a swim in the sea and chips by the pier.

Full Details

Brighton pier

Brighton pier

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Ovingdean beach

Ovingdean beach

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Brighton from the pier

Brighton from the pier

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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The flat, open Ouse valley to Rodmell and Kingston, then an open chalk ridge to Rottingdean and Brighton.

East Sussex SWC Walk 65 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 9 miles (16 km)

This walk takes in the morning along the beautiful (and entirely flat) valley of the River Ouse, passing through the pretty village of Rodmell (summer home of Virginia and Leonard Woolf) on the way. Lunch is at a popular pub in the peaceful village of Kingston, nestling in the South Downs near Lewes. In the afternoon, the route goes across the downs, with fine and expansive views, to the sea in the village of Rottingdean. From there you can either take a very regular bus into Brighton, or finish the walk to Brighton Pier along the seafront.

Full Details

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

2 April 2005

01-Apr-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Looking back across the Downs

Looking back across the Downs

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Looking towards Seaford

Looking towards Seaford

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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The heart of the Downs

The heart of the Downs

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Looking back at point 5

Looking back at point 5

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Approaching Bishopstone village

Approaching Bishopstone village

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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A loop to Rodmell for lunch, then up and across the South Downs. Finishes by the sea.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 26 • Toughness: 6/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This walk offers a wealth of contrasting scenery, passing alongside a river, then rising to the heights of the South Downs to command views both inland and out to the coast, before descending to pass through pretty villages en route to the seaside. It begins at Southease station then follows the banks of the River Ouse to Rodmell for an early lunch. Afterwards the route retraces to Southease via an alternative way which passes its picturesque village centre, then ascends to follow a ridge of the South Downs Way before heading south to the village of Bishopstone and the coast. It finally follows the seaside esplanade to the sleepy seaside town of Seaford with its variety of cafes, pubs and restaurants.

Full Details

View towards Hawkley

View towards Hawkley

02-Oct-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk11

Hawkley

Hawkley

02-Oct-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk11

Hawkley 2

Hawkley 2

02-Oct-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk11

a On the way down from Leg of Mutton Hill

a On the way down from Leg of Mutton Hill

14-Feb-06 • Vivienne Lewis

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Shoulder of Mutton Hill : view south

Shoulder of Mutton Hill : view south

Petersfield to Liss

30-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Shoulder of Mutton Hill : view north

Shoulder of Mutton Hill : view north

Petersfield to Liss

30-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Trees

Trees

Petersfield to Liss

30-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Shoulder of Mutton Hill (steep, fine view) and a very walker friendly pub

Hampshire TOCW Book 2, Walk 11 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 10 miles (17 km)

Much of this walk follows the Hangers Way, a long distance path which lies within an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The name Hanger derives from the old English "Hangra" meaning a wooded slope. Much of the walk is in unspoilt countryside which remains as it was several hundred years ago. The very steep ascent of Shoulder of Mutton Hill may be slippery in winter when the slightly longer alternative route is advised. Whichever route is taken the view at the top is spectacular.

Full Details

Along the ramparts, St Catherine's Hill

Along the ramparts, St Catherine's Hill

Winchester Circular

07-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Plague Pits Valley

Plague Pits Valley

Winchester Circular

07-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk15 swcwalks

Pilgrims Way

Pilgrims Way

Winchester Circular

07-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Strange dead tree

Strange dead tree

(covered in ivy) Winchester Circular

07-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Contorted tree

Contorted tree

Winchester Circular

07-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk15 swcwalks

Weird tussocks

Weird tussocks

Winchester Circular

08-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk15 swcwalks

Marsh Marigold

Marsh Marigold

Winchester Circular

08-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk15 swcwalks

A historic Cathedral City, St Catherine's Hill and downland.

Hampshire SWC Walk 15 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This walk takes in all of its major historical points of interest in the ancient city of Winchester, and some of its prettiest streets. It then carries on out along the idyllic River Itchen to St Catherines Hill, the iron age hillfort, from where there are spectacular views of the city. From here the route crosses some typical Hampshire downland, before descending to a section of ancient watermeadows and to a newly refurbished riverside pub for lunch.

In the afternoon, the walk again climbs up onto the downs, giving fine distant views of Winchester Cathedral, before descending to the ancient Hospital of St Cross, along the watermeadows and past Winchester College to tea in the Cathedral refectory.

The walk directions pdf (see link in the button menu above) includes a detailed history of Winchester and the historic sights visited

Full Details

Amberley to Arundel

Amberley to Arundel

ITBA ! (It's That Bridge Again) Vivitar vivicam 5199 5mp

03-Feb-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Amberley Wild Brooks - flooded

Amberley Wild Brooks - flooded

We were due to walk across here, but, cleverly, we didn't. Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Off across a field

Off across a field

A muddy field. Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Those Wild Brooks again....

Those Wild Brooks again....

Still flooded. Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree, Parham Park

Tree, Parham Park

Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk11 swcwalks

Sheep reflected in floodwater

Sheep reflected in floodwater

Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk11 swcwalks

Flooded hedge

Flooded hedge

Luckily the path was still passable. Amberley Circular

14-Feb-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Out along the foot of the South Downs above Wild Brook wetland to Storrington for lunch, and back along the ridge of the Downs.

West Sussex SWC Walk 11 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This walk has the same finish along the crest of the South Downs as SWC Walk 8 Billingshurst to Amberley or SWC Walk 9 Pullborough to Amberley, but it takes in a slightly longer section of the ridge than those other two walks (5km or 3.1 miles). It also has a more varied and interesting climb up on the downs.

The morning is flat, first passing through the river meadows of the Arun to the picturesque village of Amberley, and then following a route along the foot of the downs, with fine views up onto the ridge one way, and down onto the marshland of Amberley Wild Brooks the other. You get a brief taste of the Brooks, before passing through the park of a stately home, Parham House, and to lunch in Cootham.

After lunch there is a long but reasonably well-graded climb up onto the downs (which is what earns this a toughness rating of 5), and then there is an easy walk with fine views along the top of ridge, ending with a descent to Amberley.

This is a good all-season route, with the only potential problem being the short section crossing the meadows from the River Arun to Amberley village, which can be very wet or even flooded in winter. It can be avoided by turning right out of the station and following the main road to the village. The road curves left and in 600 metres, you ignore a minor road uphill to the right. Ignore a signposted footpath to the left in 300 metres, but in 600 metres more, after the road makes a long curve right, take a footpath on the left. This brings you into the village at a road T-junction: go straight across the main village street and on up another road: this curves right to bring you to the site of the (closed) Black Horse pub, para 13 in the walk directions.

Full Details

Arundel Castle

Arundel Castle

14-Feb-06 • Vivienne Lewis

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Burpham Church

Burpham Church

14-Feb-06 • Vivienne Lewis

swcwalks book2 walk22

mossy roots

mossy roots

Amberley to Arundel

11-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Scene through trees

Scene through trees

Amberley to Arundel

11-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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zigzag track

zigzag track

Amberley to Arundel

11-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Walkers and deer

Walkers and deer

The deer had been disturbed by a shooting party, not us. Look how far behind I was, though Amberley to Arundel

11-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree in Burpham

Tree in Burpham

Amberley to Arundel

11-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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South Downs in the morning, then follows the river Arun to Historic Arundel (Castle, Cathedral)

West Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 22 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 9 miles (15 km)

This is a very beautiful and not too strenuous Downs walk which starts with a slow gradual climb amongst a luxuriance of wild flowers throughout the summer months. It takes in the pretty village of Burpham for lunch. After lunch it meanders along the River Arun to Arundel allowing a visit to the castle for those who arrive before 4pm. Arundel is also remarkable for the fact that it contains 5 branches of Peglers, the specialist walking and expedition outfitters with their young and friendly staff.

Full Details

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Swans near the South Downs Way, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex book3 amberley southdownsway pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Near the South Downs Way, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex book3 amberley southdownsway pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

King's Buildings, near the South Downs Way, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex book3 amberley southdownsway kingsbuildings pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

The South Downs Way, looking east from Toby's Stone, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex book3 amberley southdownsway pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Chicken farm, near Sutton, West Sussex, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex sutton book3 amberley pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

The White Horse, Sutton, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex sutton whitehorse book3 amberley pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

Book 3, Walk 39, Amberley to Pulborough

The stormy Downs, 11 February 2007

11-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

westsussex book3 amberley pulborough swcwalks walk39 tocw339

The South Downs with good views in the morning. Lunch in a small village. A gentle afternoon stroll through the West Weald with downland views to finish.

West Sussex SWC Walk 39 • Toughness: 6/10 • Length: 10 miles (18 km)

This walk starts with a climb up out of Amberley village and the Arun valley onto the crest of the South Downs following the South Downs Way (SDW) on a wide chalky track for 5km to Bignor Hill, with magnificent views.

Leaving the SDW, it descends to lunch at a remote rural pub, The White Horse Inn, Sutton (01798 869221)

In the afternoon it is flatter and more wooded Rother valley, coming to a tea stop in the White Heart Pub (01798 873321) by the lovely medieval bridge at Stopham.

Its a few km from there to Pulborough station - there is a shorter direct route along the road. NB There are no facilities near the station.

Full Details

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The Bridge Inn, Houghton Bridge

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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River Arun between Houghton and South Stoke

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Gate into Arundel Park

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Looking south from Arundel Park

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Looking down on Swanbourne Lake in Arundel Park

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Arundel Cathedral

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Memorial in Arundel Cathedral

19-Jul-10 • Sean O'Neill

book3, swcwalks, walk100

A contrast between peaceful villages in the Arun Valley and an attractive old town with a castle and cathedral.

West Sussex SWC Walk 100 • Toughness: 6/10 • Length: 13 miles (23 km)

The full Main Walk goes from Amberley station to Arundel, completes a circuit back to Houghton Bridge and then takes a different route to Arundel again. The advantage of this unusual walk design is that you can choose to do only the first two-thirds or the last two-thirds of the full route as circular walks from Amberley and Arundel respectively, or indeed just one of the three legs as a short walk.

From Amberley station, the walk crosses Houghton Bridge to go along the west bank of the River Arun, then reverses the start of Book 1 Walk 32 (Arundel to Amberley) by climbing over the South Downs through Arundel Park. The feature which dominates the town is Arundel Castle, the principal seat of the Dukes of Norfolk; there was a Norman fortification on the site but the present building is predominantly Victorian. It is open to the public from April to October; admission (2016) is £9-18. On the way into the town you go past the ornate Roman Catholic Arundel Cathedral, completed in 1873 in a French Gothic style, then the interesting parish church of St Nicholas: its unique feature is the separate Fitzalan Chapel, determined in 1879 to be part of Arundel Castle and hence Roman Catholic.

The walk now gets progressively easier. It returns to the other side of the River Arun and goes upstream for a short distance before heading into the low hills to the east, on the edge of the large Angmering Park estate. It soon descends into the neighbouring villages of Wepham and Burpham (pronounced Burfam), where it temporarily rejoins the Book 1 route. Instead of that walk's steep climb onto the downs, however, the route stays in the Arun valley and rejoins the river shortly before Houghton Bridge. You can explore the industrial heritage of south-east England in the nearby Amberley Museum and Heritage Centre, open from March to October; admission (2016) is £11.50.

The final leg along the valley back to Arundel is also undemanding. Two interlacing routes are given, one along the centre of the...

Full Details

boat on river arun

boat on river arun

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

yellow flowers

yellow flowers

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

bridge

bridge

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

ruins in arundel

ruins in arundel

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

cathedral of our lady philip howard, arundel

cathedral of our lady philip howard, arundel

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

cows in the field

cows in the field

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

arundel castle

arundel castle

23-Jul-06 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk32

Arundel Castle, its parkland, and the South Downs

West Sussex TOCW Book 1, Walk 32 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This lovely South Downs walk passes through Arundel, which has a very pretty and historic centre, aa Cathedral, and a very large and picturesque Castle, and then through the castle's landscaped parkland. Amberley, at the end of the walk, has a pretty riverside tea garden and a recommended pub.

The walk starts and ends along the River Arun. It goes up Arundel’s old High Street, lined with ancient buildings, to the Duke of Norfolk’s castle. The Norfolk family have been Roman Catholics for centuries, hence you pass the only church in the UK that is part Catholic and part Protestant (the Catholic part is their chapel, separated off by an iron grille).

You pass the impressive Roman Catholic Cathedral (free entry, recommended) then enter the 1,240-acre Arundel Park (the park is closed on March 24th each year, but the public footpaths should remain open on that day). From the Hiorne Tower, you descend to Swanbourne Lake, then go up and through the Park to exit it through a gap in the wall, to walk above the River Arun again.

The route leads you to the isolated hamlet of South Stoke, with its unusual church and from there you walk beside the river all the way to the village of Burpham, with its church, and pub – your lunchtime stop. The walk requires a relatively early start from London if you want to be in time for food at the lunchtime pub; the distance to the lunch pub in Burpham from the start of the walk is 6 miles, 2.5 hours of walking.

The afternoon’s walk, up, over and down the chalky South Downs, makes for a nice contrast to the morning’s walk.

There are several stretches that are steep (but with excellent views in compensation) and some of the descents on chalky paths can be slippery in the wet or after recent rain. When coming down off the South Downs towards Amberley, the final leg of the walk, across the south-western section of Amberley Wild Brooks, should not be undertaken in winter or after periods of heavy rain, as your route over the water meadows is likely to...

Full Details

Vines

Vines

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

23-Mar-01 • lindsay_randle on Flickr

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Through the vineyard

Through the vineyard

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23-Mar-01 • lindsay_randle on Flickr

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Vineyard

Vineyard

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23-Mar-01 • lindsay_randle on Flickr

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Glider

Glider

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24-Mar-01 • lindsay_randle on Flickr

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Billinghurst to Amberley

Billinghurst to Amberley

Field patterns

14-Apr-07 • Viv Lewis on Flickr

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Billinghurst to Amberley

Billinghurst to Amberley

The South Downs Way above Amberley late afternoon

14-Apr-07 • Viv Lewis on Flickr

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Billinghurst to Amberley

Billinghurst to Amberley

Coming down off the South Downs Way just before Amberley

14-Apr-07 • Viv Lewis on Flickr

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Starts in gentle countryside, with the South Downs a thin line on the horizon, then via some steep hills and hidden valleys to finish on the crest of the South Downs with a panoramic view

West Sussex SWC Walk 8 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 13 miles (23 km)

This walk is an illustration of the maxim that a pleasure deferred is a pleasure intensified. It starts in very gentle countryside, from where there are occasional glimpses of the South Downs as a thin line in the distance. Gradually throughout the day, you get closer and closer to them, and finally there is an exhilarating finish along their crest, with panoramic views of the Arun valley. But way before you get to them, just before lunch, there is a surprise area of High Weald-like territory of steep hills and hidden valleys. Early in the walk, there are some particularly fine bluebell and wood anemone woods, making this a good excursion for late April or early May. The length of the afternoon section - 13.2 km (8.2 miles) means this walk is not viable from November to February.

Full Details

Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

Book 3, Walk 48, Haslemere to Midhurst, 11/05/06

11-May-06 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

Temple view (the winds were absent). On a clear day, you can see quite a long way. 28 April '07.

28-Apr-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

Spring Coppice, near Lurgashall, 28 April '07.

28-Apr-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

Not just Bluebells, 28 April '07.

28-Apr-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

The bluebell season will soon be over: the bluebell-lover (with blue bottle), 28 April '07.

28-Apr-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Haslemere to Midhurst

Haslemere to Midhurst

Cowdray, 28 April '07.

28-Apr-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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View to the sea

View to the sea

Sandling to Wye

03-Oct-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Black Down (heathland with views) and Temple of the Winds (viewpoint), Lurgashall (picturesque village with pub by the green), Cowdray Estate (romantic ruin by Polo Fields) and historic market town of Midhurst.

West Sussex SWC Walk 48 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 13 miles (22 km)

The route leads from Haslemere station through the town’s centre and along the waymarked Serpent Trail through a small Nature Reserve to rise steeply out of town and back down through Camelsdale to then rise with the Sussex Border Path through pastures and pine and heather covered slopes up to the Black Down. Following the crest through open heathland, with far views across West Sussex and out to Hampshire, you reach the Temple Of The Winds viewpoint, with further panoramic views over the Rother Valley to the South Downs escarpment and easterly across to the West Weald.

A long descent through the sloping open grounds of Blackdown House and through bluebell-carpeted woods leads to the classic Sussex village of Lurgashall, with its pub and church at the corner of a picturesque village green and cricket pitch. The afternoon takes you through a mix of flat farmland and wooded hills to the Cowdray Estate, with its golf course-with-views as well as several polo fields, to the romantic ruins of Cowdray House, as captured by JMW Turner.

Climbing from the River Rother’s banks, Midhurst's Norman castle ruins are passed en-route to the old market town's attractive centre with its many tea options.

Full Details

View from Wolstonbury Hill

View from Wolstonbury Hill

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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View from Wolstonbury Hill 2

View from Wolstonbury Hill 2

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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Truleigh Hill from Wolstonbury Hill

Truleigh Hill from Wolstonbury Hill

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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Devils Dyke

Devils Dyke

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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On Devils Dyke

On Devils Dyke

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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Truleigh Hill from Devils Dyke

Truleigh Hill from Devils Dyke

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

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Fulking from Edburton Hill

Fulking from Edburton Hill

11-Jun-05 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk23

3 steep hills with fine views before lunch at Devil's Dyke. A gentle ridge walk in the afternoon to Upper Beeding (short bus ride to Shoreham station)

West Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 23 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 10 miles (16 km)

It is a matter of opinion which is the finest view in South East England, but the amazing panorama from Devil's Dyke on the South Downs escarpment must surely be a strong contender. Such beauty comes at a price, however, and the area immediately around the viewpoint can be exceedingly busy on a fine weekend. However, the South Downs also afford numerous other less frequented viewpoints, and this walk introduces you to several of them, including tranquil Wolstonbury Hill and Edburton Hill.

The morning in particular is a delightful series of climbs and descents on slopes covered by rare chalk grassland. In the afternoon - which is somewhat easier on the leg muscles, though still with a couple of short uphill sections - you follow the South Downs Way for a while across Fulking Escarpment, before descending into the riverside village of Upper Beeding for tea.

Full Details

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Silent Walk, 3 Feb '07.

03-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Silent Walk, 3 Feb '07.

03-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Chicken farm, Silent Walk, 3 Feb '07.

03-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Silent contemplation, 3 Feb '07

03-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Book 3, Walk 18, Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

Sunlit tree, Silent Walk, 3 Feb '07

03-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Up the bridleway

Up the bridleway

Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

04-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Up the bridleway

Up the bridleway

Petersfield to Rowlands Castle

04-Jan-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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An easy southerly trek through East Hampshire.

West Sussex SWC Walk 18 • Toughness: 3/10 • Length: 9 miles (16 km)

An undulating ramble through the little known western reaches of the South Downs. Though there are one or two steep climbs, the gradients are not arduous, and your reward is some fine hilltop views in the second half of the walk.

Full Details

Pulborough Circular walk - does NOT go up there!

Pulborough Circular walk - does NOT go up there!

Sandstone rocks near Rackham Old School. Sussex. D.Allen: VIVITAR 5199mp

01-Jan-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Stopham bridge

Stopham bridge

again.... Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Arun and Wey Canal

Arun and Wey Canal

Thats it in the foreground.... Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Arun and Wey Canal

Arun and Wey Canal

Thats it in the foreground.... Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Greatham Bridge

Greatham Bridge

Looks like a stone caterpillar.... Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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The perils we face

The perils we face

Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Amberley Wildbrooks

Amberley Wildbrooks

Pulborough Circular

23-Mar-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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This is a long but easy walk which explores the water meadows of the River Arun, with the South Downs as a dramatic backdrop.

West Sussex SWC Walk 14 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 12 miles (21 km)

The Main Walk climbs gently at first to give a panoramic view of the South Downs from the low hills above Pulborough. It joins the Wey-South Path to go past two medieval bridges across the canalised River Arun, which was part of an important transport link between London and the South Coast in the early 19thC. The walk then goes across the extensive water meadows of Amberley Wild Brooks, an important area for bird-life and wetland plants, coming to the unspoilt village of Amberley for a pub lunch.

In the afternoon, the walk continues through Parham Park with its Elizabethan manor house, then past the gliders at Parham Airfield. Towards the end of the day you have the opportunity to spend some time bird-watching in the RSPB Pulborough Brooks Nature Reserve at Wiggonholt, which has a tearoom in its Visitor Centre, before a final stretch alongside the River Arun back to Pulborough.

The water meadows are deliberately flooded in winter and can be boggy at any time of the year after heavy rain. This walk should therefore only be attempted in relatively dry conditions.

Full Details

Pulborough to Amberley

Pulborough to Amberley

Pulborough Levels

26-Jul-08 • Viv Lewis on Flickr

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Pulborough to Amberley

Pulborough to Amberley

Pulborough Levels

26-Jul-08 • Viv Lewis on Flickr

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The devil - standing in a pond

The devil - standing in a pond

Rising Sun's garden, Nutbourne. Pulborough to Amberley

13-Apr-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk9 swcwalks

Up a hill

Up a hill

Pulborough to Amberley

13-Apr-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk9 swcwalks

Tree

Tree

Pulborough to Amberley

13-Apr-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk9 swcwalks

Tree

Tree

Pulborough to Amberley

13-Apr-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk9 swcwalks

Murky pond

Murky pond

Pulborough to Amberley

13-Apr-09 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk9 swcwalks

Historic Pulborough, gentle hills, a gem of a pub, an RSPB marshland, and up and over the South Downs to Amberley.

West Sussex SWC Walk 9 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 10 miles (17 km)

Though it traverses similar territory to its sister walk (see Walk Options below) and has the same South Downs finish, this walk has a quite different atmosphere to Billingshurst to Amberley. It first passes through the surprisingly quaint historic centre of Pulborough, tucked away on the edge of the modern village, and then climbs into a delightful area of gentle hills, which afford magnificent views of the Downs to the south and the plains to the north. After lunch in Nutbourne or Marehill, the route takes you along the edge of Pulborough Brooks, an unspoilt marshland area which is now an RSPB nature reserve. The RSPB visitor centre provides a possible tea stop. There is then a three kilometre section on a quiet road that at first passes through woodland, and then the hamlet of Rackham. By now the South Downs loom magnificently ahead, and you climb up onto them by a steep path (different from the one used for the Billingshurst to Amberley walk, incidentally) for a bravura finish with magnificent views of the Arun valley.

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Horse in buttercups

Horse in buttercups

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

view

view

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

Descent into Compton

Descent into Compton

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

Compton

Compton

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

Through a rapefield

Through a rapefield

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

Path through crops

Path through crops

Rowlands Castle Circular

07-Jun-09 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks rowlandscastlecircular

Galls on Field Maple

Galls on Field Maple

Rowlands castle circular

14-Aug-10 • moontiger on Flickr

pretty book3 notso swcwalks walk68

A demanding walk, first through park- and woodland, then through the remote westerly valleys of the South Downs

West Sussex SWC Walk 68 • Toughness: 9/10 • Length: 15 miles (26 km)

This demanding West Sussex walk in the undulating western part of the South Downs is characterised initially by a mixture of park- and woodland, then steep lonely valleys and some far views to the main South Downs Ridge.
It starts off towards Stansted House along a 1-mile-long beech avenue – one of the best in England according to Pevsner, and then heads north along the easterly edge of Stansted Forest and across fields via the hamlets of West, Up and East Marden to a very remote pub in Hooksway, with particularly nice views on the route between the hamlets, including up to the northern escarpment of the South Downs.
From lunch you climb back out of the secluded valley on a westerly route to Compton, from where another couple of hills need to be crossed to finish along the westerly edge of Stansted Forest back into Rowlands Castle, with its teashop and a choice of pubs.
The walk (especially the extended version) features several sustained, steep climbs and descents.

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SDC10376

SDC10376

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

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SDC10377

SDC10377

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

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SDC10378

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

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SDC10379

SDC10379

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

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SDC10380

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

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SDC10381

SDC10381

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

book3, swcwalks, walk33

SDC10382

SDC10382

28-Jun-10 • Andrew Murphy

book3, swcwalks, walk33

Follows the South Downs Way along the ridge of the South Downs. Good views in the morning, a forested trail in the afternoon (travel by bus).

West Sussex SWC Walk 33 • Toughness: 3/10 • Length: 12 miles (20 km)

This is a ridge walk along the South Downs Way (SDW) along a good, easy to follow path. There are fine views in the moring. The afternoon is forested, so even though you're on top of the ridge, its like walking along a forested trail. There might be better views in winter

At Coking its a (regular) bus ride to Chichester. Or stay overnight, and continue along the SDW towards Petersfield

There are no pubs or other refreshment stops on this walk

If you walk in ther other direction, there is a nice pub in Amberley to finish in.

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Hay

Hay

Amberley to Lancing

09-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 swcwalks walk26

Deadheads

Deadheads

Carline thistle in early stage of deadness? Amberley to Lancing

11-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 swcwalks walk26

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19-Jul-10 • Andrew Murphy

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19-Jul-10 • Andrew Murphy

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DSC00010

19-Jul-10 • Andrew Murphy

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19-Jul-10 • Andrew Murphy

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19-Jul-10 • Andrew Murphy

A ridge walk along the South Downs Way, passing Chanctonbury Ring.

West Sussex SWC Walk 26 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 14 miles (24 km)

This walk, which can be done in either direction, follows the South Downs Way (SDW). The route follows the crest of South Downs Ridge with good views in both directions, It passes Chanctonbury Ring, a ring of trees planted on the remains of an ancient Hill Fort. This spot has a beautiful 360° views, and is the recommended picnic spot.

Apart from the endings in Lancing or Shoreham, the route is very well way-marked. All the paths are wide, easy to walk on, and easy to follow. The route is almost entirely over an open, treeless, chalk ridge, which is very exposed in bad or windy weather.

At the half way point, there is a break in the ridge, where the route crosses a busy A Road. There is a longer 'via Washington alternative' which avoids this crossing, and passes a walker friendly pub.

This walk can be done with the help of an OS map (or by printing the map segments), but the instructions below alone are sufficient.

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