Saturday Walkers Club www.walkingclub.org.uk
road

road

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

cows

cows

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

stream

stream

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

cornfield

cornfield

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

bushes

bushes

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

all saints church in icklesham

all saints church in icklesham

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

crater

crater

18-Jun-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk25

The hardest walk in the book. A gentle start with the 1066 Path and a great pub for lunch. After lunch, a great coastal cliff walk with 4 steep climbs, Fairlight Glen naturist beach, fish and chips on Hastings seafront, so one for summer.

East Sussex TOCW Book 1, Walk 25 • Toughness: 9/10 • Length: 12 miles (20 km)

This is a delightful walk with lovely coastal views is the hardest in the book - it has a very hilly ending, and is best done in summer if you would like to swim, otherwise in spring when the woodland floor is covered in bluebells and other wildflowers and, in early May, the gorse is bright yellow. The inland start from Winchelsea is flat to begin with, with just 1 climb for lunch at an excellent and very pretty pub. After lunch the route heads to the coast and follows the coastal path, and there are 4 steep cliffs to climb (with the Fireheights lookout, and Fairlight Glen beach in the middle). Hastings has a 'working beach', a resort beach, and a quaint old town.

Starting below Winchelsea (once a coastal port, but storms have since stranded it 2km inland), the walk follows the River Brede and canals to an early lunch at a 17th century pub near the church in Icklesham. The pub is quaint, and its beer garden has a lovely view, but don't dawdle, less than 5km of this walk is before lunch, and the ending is strenuous.

After lunch, the route crosses two relatively clear streams, both with ill-fitting names: Pannel Sewer and Marsham Sewer, to the coast at Cliff End.

From here, the walk follows the hilly coastline, with sea views. A detour off the coastal route through the houses of Fairlight is required, as a result of severe coastal erosion (an average 1.4 metres of cliff-face is lost annually in these parts). Thereafter you follow the coastline through Hastings Country Park, with 3 steep climbs out of the wooded Warren, Fairlight and Ecclesbourne Glens. The first summit is Fireheights, a coastguard lookout, with excellent views of the coastline. from here on, there are many side paths worth exploring to secluded viewpoints.

The very picturesque Fairlight Glen has a nudist beach where you can drip-dry in fine weather, if you don't happen to have a towel. The path down to it is officially closed due to landslips, but (at your own risk) duck under the fence by the 'closed'...

Full Details

A South Downs ridge walk ... maximum view for minimum effort, with historic Lewes to finish.

East Sussex TOCW Book 1, Walk 29 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This is an exhilarating walk along the South Downs Way, a ridge of South Downs chalk grassland with panoramic views inland and out to the sea by Brighton.

On the way up to the ridge, the route passes Butcher's Wood and visits a church in Clayton and a still-working Clayton Windmill. The friends of Jack and Jill windmill sometimes serve tea on weekends.

On the South Downs Way you pass medieval dew ponds and an Iron Age fort at Ditchling Beacon. After lunch, down below in Plumpton, you climb back up onto the downs, before a final walk into Lewes along the River Ouse, then up to the Norman castle and through its gateway into the ancient High Street.

This is an easier walk, with far fewer ups and downs, than Walk 25 from Winchelsea to Hastings.

Its a great picnic walk, as the pub is at the bottom of the ridge, and it would save you descending from the ridge to the pub, then climbing back up again afterwards

Full Details

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 1

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 1

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 2

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 2

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 3

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 3

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 4

Book 1, Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford 4

Seaford beach, 18 June '05

18-Jun-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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drama in the sky

drama in the sky

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk31

by the way

by the way

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk31

near glynde

near glynde

06-Aug-05 • Bela Struzkova

book1, swcwalks, walk31

The best walk in the book! A South Downs ridge, picture postcard Alfriston, Cuckmere Haven (beach), and cliffs with views of the Seven Sisters. Long but worth it.

East Sussex TOCW Book 1, Walk 31 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 14 miles (23 km)

Everyone's favourite walk in the book. It starts with a South Downs Ridge walk. Lunch is in the picturesque village of Alfriston. After lunch there is Cuckmere Haven (a pretty river valley), and a coastal cliff walk into Seaford. You can swim at Cuckmere Haven or Seaford.

Near the start, the route goes through Firle Park and then follows the South Downs Way for much of the day, with not as much climbing as Walk 25's arduous route into Hastings, and with marvellous views across the lush valleys to the north and down to the sea. There are three lovely villages to enjoy during the course of the day, all with open churches: West Firle, West Dean, and (the suggested lunchstop) the old smuggling village of Alfriston, which likes to call its church a cathedral.

There is slightly further to walk after lunch than before it. From Alfriston the route follows the riverbank through the Cuckmere Valley and through Friston Forest down to Exceat, an extinct village on the edge of the Seven Sisters Country Park, where there is a Visitors’ Centre. The Vanguard Way then leads through the Seaford Head Nature Reserve – hoopoe, bluethroat and wryneck have been seen here – to the beach at Cuckmere Haven. This is in season a good enough place to take a dip or just to enjoy a front-stalls view of the white cliffs of the Seven Sisters.

Finally there is a walk along the coastal path and down into Seaford, a seaside town with a long esplanade and reconstructed shingle beach.

Full Details

View from the Downs

View from the Downs

28-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Detail, garden of Southover House

Detail, garden of Southover House

28-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 1

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 1

Hanging, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 2

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 2

26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 3

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 3

The Horseshoe Machine, Rodmell, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Lewes via Rodmell Circular 4

Lewes via Rodmell Circular 4

Church, Southease, 26 March '05

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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South Downs Way along a chalk ridge in the morning, remote Rodmell for lunch, then back up and over the downs to the coast. Undercliff path, or bus to Brighton

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 24 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 9 miles (16 km)

This fine South Downs walk follows ridges of chalk grassland offering panoramic views in all directions. It begins in the historic town of Lewes, then the route quickly rises to follow a ridge along the top of the Downs before descending for lunch to the picturesque and historic village of Rodmell with its literary associations. In the afternoon it gently climbs back over the Downs to the sea to emerge at the town of Saltdean, with the option to continue for a further 8.5 km to Brighton.

Walk options: The directions for the following variations appear at the end of the main walk text. (see p260).

a) Alternative return to Lewes via Northease Manor: This route, which is lower-lying than the main walk route, takes you inland via Northease Manor. You follow the main walk directions to point [5], then follow the directions for this option at the end of the main walk text.

b) Shorter walk ending at Southease: You can reduce the length of the walk to 12.5km (7.8 miles) by ending at Southease and returning by train to Lewes from there. Follow the main walk directions until point [5], then follow the directions at the end of the main walk text.

c) Lewes to Seaford walk (via South Downs): For the ultimate, invigorating long walk (24.8km/15.4 miles) from Lewes to Seaford, you can take the short walk option (b) above, ending at Southease station, then take the separate Southease to Seaford (walk 26, option (a) in this book) which starts at Southease station.

An option of this walk to Brighton via Rottingdean is available on the website of the Saturday Walkers’ Club www.walkingclub.org.uk

Both these options use the fine downland start of the main walk, which climbs from Lewes to the South Downs ridge, with magnificent views across the plains of the river Ouse.

Full Details

The trig point on the downs near Southease

The trig point on the downs near Southease

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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The South Downs

The South Downs

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Downs view

Downs view

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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From second half of Lewes via West Firle, looking back to first half

From second half of Lewes via West Firle, looking back to first half

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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West Firle

West Firle

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

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Old Forge in Glynde

Old Forge in Glynde

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk25

Hill near the start

Hill near the start

23-Jan-05 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk25

Long. A steep hill (views) to Glynde. Lunch in quiet West Firle, then the South Downs Way (chalk ridge), with a flat valley walk back to historic Lewes

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 25 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 14 miles (23 km)

Each of the three sections of this walk makes a fine walk in itself. Put together, they make a grand day's circuit in stunning scenery.The main walk starts in the historic town of Lewes with the early section having fine views over the town and castle. After reaching a secluded valley, skylarks can often to be heard whilst hovering in the sky. The mid section along the South Downs Way offers extensive views both inland and towards the port of Newhaven with the Channel beyond. The final stretch re-enters Lewes along the levee beside the River Ouse.

The walk has 360 metres of ascent spread over three steepish hills, but in between there are long sections which are mainly level. The main walk is not well suited to December and January due to the limited daylight.

Full Details

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

25-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

Book 2, Walk 26, Southease to Seaford

2 April 2005

01-Apr-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Looking back across the Downs

Looking back across the Downs

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Looking towards Seaford

Looking towards Seaford

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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The heart of the Downs

The heart of the Downs

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Looking back at point 5

Looking back at point 5

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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Approaching Bishopstone village

Approaching Bishopstone village

02-Apr-05 • Peter Conway

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A loop to Rodmell for lunch, then up and across the South Downs. Finishes by the sea.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 26 • Toughness: 6/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This walk offers a wealth of contrasting scenery, passing alongside a river, then rising to the heights of the South Downs to command views both inland and out to the coast, before descending to pass through pretty villages en route to the seaside. It begins at Southease station then follows the banks of the River Ouse to Rodmell for an early lunch. Afterwards the route retraces to Southease via an alternative way which passes its picturesque village centre, then ascends to follow a ridge of the South Downs Way before heading south to the village of Bishopstone and the coast. It finally follows the seaside esplanade to the sleepy seaside town of Seaford with its variety of cafes, pubs and restaurants.

Full Details

Even Giants Rest after Giant Steps!

Even Giants Rest after Giant Steps!

Lunch stop Wilmington, prior to ascending the South Downs. D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Sep-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 1

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 1

Long Man, short sheep. 17 February '07

17-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 2

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 2

...a waste of a good walk. 17 February '07

17-Feb-07 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Walk from Berwick to Eastbourne

Walk from Berwick to Eastbourne

View of South Downs.Taken near Wilmington, Sussex. D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Mar-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Walking to the Long Man....

Walking to the Long Man....

....of Wilmington. Berwick to Eastbourne

06-Jul-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Bee and butterfly window

Bee and butterfly window

Wilmington church ... Berwick to Eastbourne

06-Jul-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 3

Book 2, Walk 27, Berwick to Eastbourne 3

The man, 7 July '07

07-Jul-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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A reservoir, then the South Downs Way past pretty villages (Jevington and Wilmington) and a ridge walk.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 27 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 12 miles (21 km)

This South Downs walk heads from inland Sussex to the coast, taking in a variety of scenery along the way. From Berwick the walk cuts across to the peaceful birdwatchers’ paradise of Arlington Reservoir before crossing farmland towards Wilmington, then ascends to the huge chalk figure of the Long Man. From here the route continues to the historic smuggling village of Jevington, then ascends the South Downs to follow ridges of chalk grassland with views in all directions, before descending to the seaside resort of Eastbourne and the possibility of extending the walk to the dramatic heights of Beachy Head.

Note that this walk involves one busy road crossing (A27) at Wilmington.

Full Details

Book 2, Walk 28, Seaford to Eastbourne

Book 2, Walk 28, Seaford to Eastbourne

Seven Sisters, 28 March 2005

27-Mar-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

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02-Apr-05 • Andrew Murphy

The best walk in the Southeast! A dramatic cliff walk passing Cuckemere Haven, the Seven Sisters and Beachy Head as the South Downs meets the sea. Ends with Eastbourne's promenade and pier.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 28 • Toughness: 9/10 • Length: 13 miles (22 km)

This classic cliff-top walk – one of the finest coastal walks in England – affords stunning (and very famous) views of the white cliffs of the Seven Sisters, and the renowned Beachy Head, before ending in the elegant seafront town of Eastbourne. There is quite a lot of climbing and descending on the walk – indeed, apart from the section around Cuckmere Haven and the finish along the Eastbourne seafront, almost none of the route is flat – but somehow in the grandeur of the scenery the effort is not noticed.

In summer, the walk also offers numerous opportunities for a dip in the sea: which is best will depend on the tide. Seaford and Eastbourne beaches can be swum at any state of the tide. At Cuckmere Haven and Birling Gap, however, there are awkward underwater rocks that are well covered at high water and exposed when the tide is out, but covered by shallow sea for a period in between; nonetheless, if you catch these beaches at the right time, they make a wonderfully scenic place for a dip.

Take care near the cliff edges on this walk, as they are crumbly and liable to collapse: the official advice is to keep 5 metres from any cliff edge (advice regularly ignored by summer tourist: but don’t copy them!).

Full Details

Hastings Old Town 2

Hastings Old Town 2

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Hastings Old Town

Hastings Old Town

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Hastings Old Town 3

Hastings Old Town 3

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

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Hastings Old Town 1

Hastings Old Town 1

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk29

Military canal 1

Military canal 1

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk29

Military canal

Military canal

21-Aug-04 • Peter Conway

swcwalks book2 walk29

Book 2, Walk 29, Hastings to Rye

Book 2, Walk 29, Hastings to Rye

2 May 2005

02-May-05 • MEW2005 on Flickr

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Seaside Hastings, a hilly cliff walk with 4 steep climbs and a remote naturist beach. Gentle afternoon to historic Winchelsea and Rye via a noted viewpoint.

East Sussex TOCW Book 2, Walk 29 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This rewarding walk starts with a fine clifftop coastal walk with steep climbs along the way. This section is the most strenuous part of the walk. Lunch is at Pett Level, after which the terrain levels out, before leading up through the New Gate into Winchelsea for tea. After tea and just east of the town, you reach The Look Out, offering panoramic views across the whole of Romney Marsh and the Kent Downs beyond. From there it is down and along to Ferry Bridge, following an easy flat route north east to Rye.

Full Details

Circular Gap 2

Circular Gap 2

Leafy lane in autumn. Wadhurst short circular

16-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Ayers Rock......

Ayers Rock......

....for bugs. Dead stump, Wadhurst short circular

16-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Roadside Tree

Roadside Tree

Wadhurst short circular

16-Nov-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Wadhurst Circular walk swcextrawalk5

Wadhurst Circular walk swcextrawalk5

Disinterested donkey and horse at Great Shoesmiths Farm, Near Wadhurst, Kent

10-May-13 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Wadhurst Circular walk

Wadhurst Circular walk

Interior of The Cottage Tea Room, Wadhurst, Kent

10-May-13 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Down into the woods

Down into the woods

near Wadworth

08-Nov-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Starting the walk at Wadhurst Station

Starting the walk at Wadhurst Station

04-May-16 • quitenearmike on Flickr

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This walk follows the Sussex Border path to Bewl Water, then follows its banks back to Wadhurst for tea. Gentle gradients but never flat.

East Sussex SWC Walk 5 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 10 miles (17 km)

Apart from at the very end, this is a completely different route from the Wadhurst short and main walks in Time Out Country Walks Book two. It follows the Sussex Border Path to the large reservoir of Bewl Water, and then follows its banks back to Wadhurst village for tea. This is beautiful country, full of hidden valleys and picturesque farms. Being the Weald, the route is almost never flat, but the gradients on this route are always gentle.

Full Details

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 1

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 1

Eridge Old Park, 7 May '07

07-May-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 2

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 2

Near Eridge Green, 7 May '07

07-May-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 3

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 3

Hedgerow flowers, 7 May '07

07-May-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 4

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 4

Groombridge Station, Spa Valley Railway, 7 May '07

07-May-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 5

Book 3, Walk 19, Frant to Tunbridge Wells 5

Three Acre Wood, 7 May '07

07-May-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Groombridge Place Gardens in spring

02-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Daffodils at Groombridge Place

02-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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A varied High Weald walk with stretches through parkland, restored heathland and woods containing massive sandstone outcrops, finishing alongside the Spa Valley Railway.

East Sussex SWC Walk 19 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This walk through the High Weald near the border of East Sussex and Kent has plenty of interest and variety. After escaping from the suburban charms of Tunbridge Wells you climb through woodland to a possible early lunch stop in the elegant hill-top village of Frant, dominated by its large triangular green. The walk continues with an attractive but potentially muddy section through the landscaped parkland of the Nevill Estate's Eridge Old Park. On the edge of the park Forge Wood has a particularly fine display of bluebells in spring.

After the alternative lunch stop in the hamlet of Eridge Green you pass the first of several massive sandstone outcrops, Eridge Rocks. The Main Walk then goes through Broadwater Warren, an RSPB nature reserve (free entry) which is undergoing a ten-year restoration programme to bring back its original heathland habitat. You glimpse another sandstone outcrop at High Rocks and the final stretch is alongside the Spa Valley Railway (SVR), a restored branch line.

The route into Tunbridge Wells goes across its large wooded common into The Pantiles, a famous colonnaded walkway with interesting shops, galleries, cafés and (sometimes) market stalls. This spa town developed in the 17thC after an influential nobleman staying nearby became convinced that the iron-rich water from its chalybeate spring had curative properties. Its popularity waned in the 18thC when sea bathing became more fashionable than ‘taking the waters’, but revived after regular visits from Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. The town's popularity with the royal family led to it being granted the “Royal” prefix in 1909.

While the RSPB's forestry operations are continuing you might have to take an alternative route through Broadwater Warren; there should be information panels to help you do this.

Full Details

Little dinky mushrooms

Little dinky mushrooms

Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Yellow slope

Yellow slope

Due to some sort of non-dandelion. Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree

Tree

Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Large coppiced tree

Large coppiced tree

Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Mouldy agaric

Mouldy agaric

Theres some that reckon Father Christmas was inspired by fly agaric hallucinations. Here's his hat and beard. Fly agaric is poisonous. Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree and sign

Tree and sign

Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree

Tree

Forest Row Circular

10-Sep-11 • moontiger on Flickr

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The heathlands of Ashdown Forest. Travel by Bus.

East Sussex SWC Walk 23 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 10 miles (18 km)

This walk explores the interesting high heathlands of Ashdown Forest, with extensive views both south and north (there is for example a fine distant view of the South Downs in the early stages of this walk).

The heaths are particularly beautiful from mid August to mid September, when the purple heather is at its best, and from March to May when there is plenty of gorse in bloom. In the afternoon the walk passes the Ashdown Forest Visitor Centre, which has lots of interesting displays about this unique habitat.

The walk is not all heathland, however. Interspersed with it are sections across some pleasant green valleys, as well as some woodland. For lunch there is a pub with a fine garden.

Special note : these directions aim to be comprehensive, but need careful following on the heath sections, where once you are lost it is very hard to re-discover the route. A compass and the Explorer map is certainly useful for emergencies (as is a GPS, obviously).

Full Details

Sheep at trig. point next to dried out pond on South Downs Way

Sheep at trig. point next to dried out pond on South Downs Way

above Ouse Valley

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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One trig. point, two sheep

One trig. point, two sheep

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Hangliders awaiting wind

Hangliders awaiting wind

SDW near Mill Mound

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Sheep near radio masts

Sheep near radio masts

on South Downs Way

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Radio Masts Beddingham Hill

Radio Masts Beddingham Hill

South Downs Way

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Paragliders at Firle Bostal

Paragliders at Firle Bostal

along the South Downs Way, East Sussex

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Looking back along the SDW

Looking back along the SDW

near Firle Bostal

06-Apr-15 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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2 Long Ridge walks over open downs, beautiful Alfriston for lunch, and Eastbourne pier and prom. to finish.

East Sussex SWC Walk 25 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 16 miles (27 km)

This walk along the South Downs Way (SDW) consists of 2 spectacular ridge walks with a picturesque village in the middle for lunch and Eastbourne promenade, beach and pier to finish. Its a long (so summer only) but very rewarding walk. The route is well waymarked, the paths are easy walking, and the route is easy to follow. The South Downs are treeless and open, so there are good views throughout.

The walk starts in Southease, right on the SDW, and climbs the first ridge straight away, up to Firle Beacon. There is an alternate start in Glynde in case the trains to Southease don't line up.

At the end of ridge is Alfriston, a pretty village in a pretty valley with a village green dominated by a large church. 2 good pubs and a village shop to choose from for lunch.

After lunch, follow the northern leg of the SDW up and over Wilmington Hill to Jevington (pub) before a final climb to head south along another ridge towards the coast.

Rather than follow the offical SDW route downhill, continue on to the coast, then follow the 'other' leg of the SDW down in to Eastbourne. Follow the prom for a swim in the sea and chips by the pier.

Full Details

Alder

Alder

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Branch

Branch

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Trees

Trees

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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View

View

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Lunch stop

Lunch stop

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree

Tree

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

book3 walk29 swcwalks

Trees

Trees

Ashurst to Hartfield

13-Jun-08 • moontiger on Flickr

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A walk via Pooh Bridge to the attractive Wealden village of Hartfield, with a longer option over the elevated heathland of Ashdown Forest.

East Sussex SWC Walk 29 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This walk starts along the Medway valley and soon comes to the small village of Withyham for an early lunch at the Dorset Arms. After passing Withyham church (which is well worth visiting) there is a choice of three routes to the neighbouring village of Hartfield, associated with the author AA Milne and his most famous creation: coachloads of tourists regularly descend on Pooh Corner to buy all manner of Winnie-the-Pooh memorabilia.

The Short Walk heads directly for Hartfield, while the other variations continue through the extensive Buckhurst Estate into Five Hundred Acre Wood. This is the furthest point for the Main Walk, which crosses the famous Pooh Bridge on its way round to Hartfield.

The Long Walk climbs steadily through the wood and continues around the rim of a valley in Ashdown Forest, the largest area of elevated heathland in south-east England. It goes past some recognisable features from the children's stories and a memorial commemorating AA Milne and his illustrator, EF Shepard. From this viewpoint the Long Walk descends to Hartfield, also crossing Pooh Bridge.

After a tea stop in this attractive Wealden village the circular options go back along the Medway valley to Ashurst station.

Both in the Medway valley and on Ashdown Forest the ground can become waterlogged after heavy rain, so this walk is much more pleasant in relatively dry conditions.

Full Details

Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

As a means to deter walkers, Harold's dalliance with exhibitionism was somewhat flawed. 6 June '07.

06-Jun-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

6 June '07.

06-Jun-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

Book 3, Walk 30, Battle Circular

A view from Battle. 6 June '07.

06-Jun-07 • mew2005b on Flickr

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Up hill & down dale

Up hill & down dale

Battle Circular

21-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tumbledown building

Tumbledown building

Battle Circular

21-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Battle Circular

21-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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View with windmill

View with windmill

Battle Circular

21-Sep-07 • moontiger on Flickr

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The 1066 County Path, picturesque Battle and its Abbey

East Sussex SWC Walk 30 • Toughness: 3/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

If wanting to visit Battle Abbey at the end of this walk, then you should plan to set off early and take the late lunch stop. Otherwise this walk is suited for a late start and consequently an early lunch stop and a longer afternoon section, which should give you a healthy appetite for an evening meal at one of the many establishments in Battle.

Full Details

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SDC11066

04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

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04-Jun-11 • Andrew Murphy

An energetic walk over the South Downs with great views, 3 hills, 3 pubs, and a ridge.

East Sussex SWC Walk 47 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 14 miles (24 km)

This is an energetic walk (550 metres or 1,600 feet of ascent) over three distinct downland ridges, with magnificent views throughout. One of the pleasures of the walk is that the entire route is in view for much of the walk, so you can look back at the terrain you have already done or ahead to the delights to come. Navigation is easy, the walking is over wide and distinct paths, and while there are three substantial climbs, most of the walk is flat, gently undulating or downhill.

As well as plenty of grand downland walking, the route includes a start and finish in historic Lewes, quaint corners of which you see both at the start and end of the walk, an optional detour to Mount Caburn (Iron Age fort) with its dramatic viewpoint of the whole circuit, and the pleasant small village of Glynde. You also pass the remote station of Southease, with its YHA cafe nearby.

The walk passes 3 good pubs, and 3 train stations on the way (between the 3 hills, so if you want to drop out, its quite easy). You can do the walk either clockwise or anticlockwise, and directions are given for both in the attached pdf

Full Details

Manicured footpath

Manicured footpath

Not many footpaths have their own lawn and neatly clipped hedges Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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In a wood

In a wood

Ive discovered a new toy...the "fireworks" setting. Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Woodland Path

Woodland Path

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree in a wood

Tree in a wood

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Gate out of the wood

Gate out of the wood

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Gate out of a wood...

Gate out of a wood...

....into a lime green sea, Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Trees

Trees

Hassocks to Brighton

30-Aug-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Over the South Downs to Brighton, the liveliest city on the South Coast

East Sussex SWC Walk 50 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 12 miles (20 km)

Different from walking the South Downs ridge, this route traverses north to south exploring hidden valleys, woods, open access and park land. The goal is the lively town of Brighton and the sea but first you will pass through the pretty village of Ditchling, walk over Ditchling Beacon, through Stanmer Park and the University of Sussex to Falmer, the only pub stop on the walk. There is a natural breaking off point at Falmer but those who persevere walking towards Brighton will be rewarded with a lovely view of the sea from kemp town Racecourse and an easy path into Brighton. The boardwalk, pier, seafront bars, Mediterranean cuisine, fish and chips or oysters and champagne and the Lanes await you.

For the walk, you need OS Explorer Map 122 and preferably a compass. It is advisable to take plenty of water and some food as the only available refreshments, apart from the Deli at Ditchling Village some 2.5 kms into the walk, is a small café at Stanmer and the Swan Inn at Falmer is some 12 kms and 3.5 to 4 hours into the walk. The Swan stops taking orders for food at 2pm. (Possibly 2:30 if you ring the landlord Tel: 01273 681842).

Full Details

Nets

Nets

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Eastbourne Welcome

Eastbourne Welcome

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Pickled

Pickled

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Sausages

Sausages

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Can has cod

Can has cod

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Purple poppy

Purple poppy

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Lifeguards

Lifeguards

04-Jul-10 • Sarah Heenan on Flickr

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Coastal walk via Eastbourne's promenade, Beachy Head and the 7 Sisters, then inland over the downs to East Dean. Return by bus.

East Sussex SWC Walk 60 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 7 miles (12 km)

You start this walk along Eastbourne’s pleasant seafront, and then follow the coast into a hidden valley (with fine downland flowers and butterflies in summer), from where it is a steep climb up onto Beachy Head for lunch. The next stretch is one of the great classic coastal walks, a rolling descent along chalk cliffs down to Birling Gap for tea. From there, you have a gentle climb inland, with fine sea and downland views, to the village of East Dean, where there are further refreshment options, and frequent buses back to Eastbourne.

Full Details

Brighton pier

Brighton pier

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Ovingdean beach

Ovingdean beach

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Brighton from the pier

Brighton from the pier

15-Jan-16 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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The flat, open Ouse valley to Rodmell and Kingston, then an open chalk ridge to Rottingdean and Brighton.

East Sussex SWC Walk 65 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 9 miles (16 km)

This walk takes in the morning along the beautiful (and entirely flat) valley of the River Ouse, passing through the pretty village of Rodmell (summer home of Virginia and Leonard Woolf) on the way. Lunch is at a popular pub in the peaceful village of Kingston, nestling in the South Downs near Lewes. In the afternoon, the route goes across the downs, with fine and expansive views, to the sea in the village of Rottingdean. From there you can either take a very regular bus into Brighton, or finish the walk to Brighton Pier along the seafront.

Full Details

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

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23-Mar-11 • Andrew Murphy

Flat coastal walk along the south coast past busy sea front promenades and quiet beaches.

East Sussex SWC Walk 66 • Toughness: 1/10 • Length: 14 miles (24 km)

This gentle walk follows the 15 miles (24 km) of flat coastline between Eastbourne and Hastings. It is in 3 parts - 2 seafront promenades with a quiet shingle beach in between which is nice to walk on only at low tide when the flat sandy part of the beach is uncovered. If doing the middle section, check tide times so you can walk along sand at low tide, rather than the shingle, which is very heavy going. Although the entire walk is quite long, there are shorter options, as there is a railway line following the coast, with several stations en-route.

Eastbourne to Pevensey Bay - seafront promenade

Starting in Eastbourne, a faded Edwardian grandeur seaside resort, the walk heads from the station down through a pedestrian shopping street to a very nice seafront esplanade and a Victorian pier (1 km) and a sandy beach. It then follows the seafront promenade north-east, quickly leaving the touristy areas.

After 3km, it passes Soverign Harbour, a modern marina complex, crossing its sea lock via pedestrian bridges. Turn left (instead of right over the lock bridges) for shops, restaurants etc. At this point the beaches turn from sand to shingle with sand only at low tide.

The coastal path continues for 3km to Pevensey Bay. Just before you reach it, the sea front path ends, and you have a choice of sand (at low tide), shingle, or uninspiring roads behind the beach with no sea views (at high tide).

Pevensey Bay to Cooden Beach - sandy beach at low tide or mix of mix of shingle / seawall / roads behind the beach

Pevensey Bay has 2 sea-front pubs (one is a sailing club open to the public). Here you can cut the walk short by heading inland to Pevensey Station and Roman fort. NB there are 2 Pevensey Stations - the easterly one (Pevensey Bay), closest to the beach has infrequent trains.

The next section of 5 km along a very quiet section of beach is difficult except at low tide, and there are long stretches where there is no coastal path. It passes Beachlands, a long narrow village of...

Full Details

Near the start

Near the start

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Mystery plant

Mystery plant

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Sunflowers

Sunflowers

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Corn silk

Corn silk

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Sinuous boardwalk

Sinuous boardwalk

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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Verdant steps

Verdant steps

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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A cranesbill

A cranesbill

Edenbridge to Westerham

12-Sep-09 • moontiger on Flickr

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A slow climb from Eden Valley to the Greensand Ridge and the High Chart,via Chartwell (NT, Churchill's Home) and Emmetts Garden (NT).

East Sussex SWC Walk 79 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 10 miles (17 km)

When you see a view from a ridge, you do not usually know much about the countryside you are looking at. But on this walk, you start in the Eden valley and climb slowly and gently across fields up towards the Greensand Ridge, with increasingly pretty views. By the time you climb up onto the escarpment, in a series of delightful stages, the view has become a familiar friend.

In the Second World War, Winston Churchill is supposed to have looked at this very view and said: "This is what we are fighting for." Certainly, Chartwell, his house, which is passed on this walk and which is now owned by the National Trust, was his refuge and great love, though he had little enough opportunity to visit it during his time as wartime Prime Minister. This walk, with its short afternoon, is ideal if you want to visit this property.

The walk also takes in Emmetts Garden, another National Trust attraction, and offers a shortcut to this in the afternoon if you want to spend more time there. Emmetts also has a wonderful display of bluebells in late April and early May, but even better wild ones – some of the loveliest ones in southern England - are to be seen throughout the walk, particularly in the afternoon around Ide Hill, at the start of the optional Hurst Green start, and just beyond Mariner’s Hill on the Shorter Ending to Westerham.

If that is not enough, the pretty town of Westerham at the end of the walk also has its points of interest in the shape of Squerryes Court and Quebec House (National Trust), two historic houses are associated with Wolfe, the youthful general who conquered the Canadian city for the British Empire. Both are open to the public in the summer months

Full Details

Catkins

Catkins

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Tree

Tree

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Reeds

Reeds

...bravely poking up through the ash Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The giant appears

The giant appears

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Road to Wilmington Church

Road to Wilmington Church

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The Wilmington Yew

The Wilmington Yew

Berwick to Seaford

17-Apr-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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The South Downs : Windover and 'High and Over' Hills, and picturesque Alfriston. Can be extended with a chalk cliff coastal walk to Seaford.

East Sussex SWC Walk 90 • Toughness: 7/10 • Length: 8 miles (14 km)

This walk looks at territory familiar from other Saturday Walkers Club walks from unfamiliar angles, using entirely new paths to link Berwick, Wilmington, Alfriston and Exceat (pronounced Ex-seet, though Ex-ee-at is a widespread mispronunciation).

The highlights are climbs up two of the most beautiful hills in the South Downs, both of them affording panoramic views. The first of these is Windover Hill behind Wilmington, on which is found the chalk figure of the Long Man of Wilmington – seen at close quarters on this walk. The second is High and Over, a dramatic vantage point above the Cuckmere River, with views down towards Cuckmere Haven and the sea.

Before and between these two hills are two fairly flat sections – one approaching the South Downs ridge from the north, and the other along the pretty valley of the Cuckmere River south of Alfriston. Both Wilmington and Alfriston have wonderful pubs for lunch, though in the latter village you may prefer to sample one of its two tea rooms. An alternative start from Berwick also takes in a popular pub in the village of Alciston and another near Berwick church, which was decorated by members of the Bloomsbury Group.

The walk ends at the Cuckmere Inn by Exceat Bridge, from where there are very regular buses back to Seaford - or you can walk to Seaford via Cuckmere Haven and the over the cliffs of Seaford Head, a beautiful 6km (3.7 miles) extension, with stunning backward views of the chalk cliffs of the Seven Sisters. Alternatively if you are feeling energetic you can walk over the Seven Sisters to Birling Gap and East Dean.

Note that this walk is perfectly practical in winter – the lowland areas can be muddy, but no more so than anywhere else. However, it is worth noting that from October to March the sun shines into your eyes more or less constantly from Berwick to Exceat – perhaps not a great hardship if the weather has otherwise been grey and bleak.

Full Details

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SDC10590

16-Oct-10 • Andrew Murphy

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16-Oct-10 • Andrew Murphy

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16-Oct-10 • Andrew Murphy

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16-Oct-10 • Andrew Murphy

trees and meadow

trees and meadow

Buxted Circular

16-Oct-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Never mind the bollards

Never mind the bollards

Unusual bollards are made from old gas cylinders Buxted Circular

16-Oct-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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Path out of woods

Path out of woods

Buxted Circular

16-Oct-10 • moontiger on Flickr

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A gentle walk through the Weald to Poundgate, with some nice views of the Weald and the distant South Downs.

East Sussex SWC Walk 95 • Toughness: 3/10 • Length: 10 miles (16 km)

This is a gentle walk over a mix of fields and woods from a quiet station on the quiet Uckfield Line in East Sussex.

It heads north for lunch at the rural Crow and Gate pub at Poundgate. It tends to get very busy on Sundays. If walking with a larger group it is best to make a reservation, or avoid Sundays during winter, when dining outside is not an option.

There are views of the distant South Downs ridge for most of the walk

At the end, there is choice of 2 pubs for a drink

Full Details

Burgess Hill to Hassocks

Burgess Hill to Hassocks

View of water tower from path over railway near Burgess Hill. D.Allen Vivitar 5199 5mp

01-Jan-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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South Downs from Park Barn Farm on the Sussex Border Path on the Burgess Hill to Hassocks (extra) walk 108

South Downs from Park Barn Farm on the Sussex Border Path on the Burgess Hill to Hassocks (extra) walk 108

Mud to die for on the SBP between Ditchling & the South Downs. D. Allen Vivitar 5199 3 March 2007

01-Jan-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Burgess Hill to Hassocks - Sussex Border Path

Burgess Hill to Hassocks - Sussex Border Path

View from top of the South Downs towards Indian War Memorial (just over the horizon as you follow the line of trees along the Sussex Border Path). D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

01-Jun-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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The Hassocks PH

The Hassocks PH

Hassocks, West Sussex

01-Jun-06 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club Book 3 (extra) walk 108 - Burgess Hill to Hassocks: The Bull Inn & The Post Office Ditchling Sussex

Saturday Walkers Club Book 3 (extra) walk 108 - Burgess Hill to Hassocks: The Bull Inn & The Post Office Ditchling Sussex

The Sussex Border Path is an integral part of the Burgess Hill to Hassocks walk (via the South Downs) that goes through the charming village of Ditchling. As of May 2015 the building far left on the corner is now a cafe! D.Allen Vivitar 5mp

03-Mar-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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South Downs ascent

South Downs ascent

It's That Man Again! Ascending the South Downs on the Sussex Border Path near Ditchling Beacon. Photo By D.Allen Vivitar 5 mp

01-May-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Hurstpierpoint

Hurstpierpoint

Hurstpierpoint College and Chapel West Sussex. D.Allen vivitar 5199mp

02-Jul-07 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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A long almost circular walk via the Sussex Border Path, Sussex Villages, and the South Downs Way ridge from Ditchling Beacon to Wolstonbury Hill

East Sussex SWC Walk 108 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 16 miles (27 km)

This walk takes in Sussex landmarks including three windmills, two golf courses, ponds, a water tower, picturesque villages and The Sussex Downs with panoramic views of surrounding countryside and the South coast. Initially following the railway track south towards Hassocks, the walk goes east through a local rural park area and climbs up to a distinctive water tower visible for miles around. Continuing on with constant views of the Downs to the south, passing stables, farms etc, it joins the Sussex Border Path, which divides east and west Sussex, and travels south towards Ditchling (the recommended lunch stop for the short walk, and a possible early lunch stop for the main walk). Later, the path steeply ascends near Ditchling Beacon. After a descent for lunch at the Plough at Pyecombe, there is a gentler climb up Wolstonbury Hill. There follows a descent to Hurstpierpoint (and its College); the route almost coming full circle -just skirting Burgess Hill on the way to Hassocks.

Full Details

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The Dorset Arms, Withyham

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Sackville Chapel, Withyham church

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Sackville Chapel, Withyham church

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Scenes from Christ's Passion, Withyham church

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Scenes from Christ's Passion, Withyham church

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Monk's House, Withyham

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Old Buckhurst, Withyham

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Along the High Weald Landscape Trail to some attractive villages in the upper Medway Valley

East Sussex SWC Walk 109 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 10 miles (18 km)

This walk makes no great claims to originality, much of it being along the High Weald Landscape Trail (HWLT). The beginning is the reverse of Extra Walk 3 (Cowden to Eridge) and the extension has the same finish as Extra Walk 110x (Ashurst to East Grinstead). Nevertheless, as long as the clay soils are not waterlogged it makes a pleasant outing in the High Weald, with nice places for lunch and tea.

After leaving the rural station at Eridge – shared with steam trains on the Spa Valley Railway – you are soon in the undulating countryside typical of the High Weald. At Mottsmill Stream the walk joins the HWLT and follows this long-distance path through the Buckhurst Estate, with a glimpse of its grand house, Buckhurst Park. As you leave the estate you enter the small village of Withyham for lunch at the Dorset Arms.

Immediately afterwards you go past Withyham church, which is well worth visiting. A short stretch then takes you to the neighbouring village of Hartfield, associated with the author AA Milne and his most famous creation: coachloads of tourists regularly descend on Pooh Corner to buy all manner of Winnie-the-Pooh memorabilia. The walk then crosses the River Medway and climbs up the other side of the valley, with fine views across to Ashdown Forest. The descent into Forest Row goes through the co-operative enterprise of Tablehurst Farm.

The final section of the extended walk is up the long gentle incline of the Forest Way, a popular cycle route along the trackbed of a disused railway line. The hilltop town of East Grinstead has many old buildings dating back to the 14thC, including Sackville College (a Jacobean almshouse) and the imposing St Swithun's Church.

As with any walk in the High Weald, you will need to be prepared for muddy or waterlogged paths at almost any time of the year.

Full Details

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River Medway

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Cottage, Ashurst

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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River Medway

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Pooh Corner, Hartfield

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Hay Waggon, Hartfield

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Anchor Inn, Hartfield

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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Anchor Inn, Hartfield

12-Jun-10 • Sean O'Neill

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A long walk through Pooh country with far-reaching views from the top of Ashdown Forest

East Sussex SWC Walk 110 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 11 miles (18 km)

This walk has the same start as Extra Walk 29 (Ashurst Circular) and the extension has the same finish as Extra Walk 109x (Eridge to East Grinstead). Its new middle section takes in a secluded valley and a contrasting stretch on a high part of Ashdown Forest.

After an initial section along the Medway valley the walk skirts the attractive Wealden village of Hartfield (which you can detour through if you wish) and makes for a country pub in the nearby hamlet of Gallipot Street. After lunch the walk goes over a low ridge and continues alongside the stream immortalised in AA Milne's famous books – though not crossing it at Pooh Bridge itself – before climbing onto an open ridge leading to the Ashdown Forest Centre. A contrasting descent through the wooded Broadstone Warren and a section across a golf course brings you to Forest Row and a choice of places for tea.

The final section of the extended walk is up the long gentle incline of the Forest Way, a popular cycle route along the trackbed of a disused railway line. The hilltop town of East Grinstead has many old buildings dating back to the 14thC, including Sackville College (a Jacobean almshouse) and the imposing St Swithun's Church.

As with any walk in the High Weald, you will need to be prepared for muddy or waterlogged paths at almost any time of the year.

An earlier (and tougher) version of this walk included Pooh Bridge and several other places in Ashdown Forest familiar from the books, but suffered from two flaws: a long overlap with Extra Walk 29 and an unsatisfactory lunch pub. This revised version has its own defect, however: an unavoidable 800m alongside a busy road to reach the new lunch pub.

Full Details

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Spindle tree near the railway crossing

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Shaggy parasols in field outside Burwash

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Bateman's

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Bateman's

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Pond at Bateman's

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Crab apples at Bateman's

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Old oak tree outside Bateman's

06-Nov-11 • Sean O'Neill

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The High Weald, Kipling’s home, and panoramic views

East Sussex SWC Walk 112 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 8 miles (14 km)

This is a hilly – but relatively gentle – walk through the High Weald, which is particular beautiful in April and late October or early November. In the spring month, it offers plenty of wild flowers and a rich array of hornbeam trees, which become a mass of catkins at this time, and during leaf fall it has plenty of fine autumn colour.

The walk shares a very short section of the start of walk 19, Stonegate Circular in Time Out Country Walks Volume Two, and like that walk visits the pretty ridgetop village of Burwash for lunch and Batemans, the former home of the writer Rudyard Kipling, now owned by the National Trust. But its route is otherwise quite different.

The morning is borrowed from the Stonegate Variations document on this website, but from Bateman’s onwards, the walk strikes out into completely new territory, climbing by gentle stages up onto a ridge that gives you a fine backwards view towards Burwash. It then crosses an interesting country estate before descending via another ridge, with fine views, into Robertsbridge. Note that this route is quite different from the Stonegate to Robertsbridge routes outlined in Stonegate Variations

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Wood ants in Broadwater Warren

02-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Eridge Rocks

02-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Spa Valley Railway sidings at Groombridge

25-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Groombridge Station

25-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Climbers at Harrison's Rocks

25-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Climbers at Harrison's Rocks

25-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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Bluebells at Harrison's Rocks

25-Apr-11 • Sean O'Neill

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A short walk through an interesting part of the High Weald.

East Sussex SWC Walk 120 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 9 miles (15 km)

This walk covers similar ground to the western part of Extra Walk 19 (Tunbridge Wells Circular), using a different railway line to access this attractive part of the High Weald from the opposite direction. The stations at Eridge and Tunbridge Wells (West) are now connected again by the heritage Spa Valley Railway, and on days when it is operating you are likely to see and hear steam trains at several places along the route.

The morning section is an undulating route across typical High Weald territory, starting with a slightly longer route to Mottsmill Stream than that in Extra Walk 109 (Eridge to East Grinstead). You can then choose between a high-level open route with fine views, or a lower route through a secluded valley with good displays of bluebells and other spring flowers. Both routes combine on the approach to Groombridge; one of many rural villages which developed around its railway station, outgrowing the original hamlet (now called Old Groombridge) across the county border in Kent.

The afternoon section starts by going past Groombridge Place, a beautiful Jacobean manor house surrounded by a medieval moat. You then follow the railway line a short distance up the Grom valley before turning into Broadwater Forest. Much of this area was acquired by the RSPB in 2007 and is now the Broadwater Warren nature reserve (free entry). The southern end of the wood is also a nature reserve (managed by the Sussex Wildlife Trust) and the Main Walk goes past one of the massive sandstone outcrops in the area, Eridge Rocks.

The RSPB have been undertaking a ten-year restoration programme in Broadwater Warren to bring back its original heathland habitat. Most of this work programme has now been completed but be aware that you might be required to take an alternative route through the reserve.

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Jevington Tea Gardens

Jevington Tea Gardens

Berwick to Birling Gap walk

19-May-12 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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The ridge to Friston

The ridge to Friston

Berwick to Birling Gap walk

19-May-12 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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On Flagstaff Point

On Flagstaff Point

19-May-12 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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The last section to Birling Gap

The last section to Birling Gap

19-May-12 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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On the Seven Sisters

On the Seven Sisters

Berwick to Birling Gap walk

19-May-12 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Shetland with foal

Shetland with foal

Berwick to Birling Gap

19-May-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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Flax field

Flax field

Berwick to Birling Gap

19-May-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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via Wilmington, Jevington and Flagstaff point

East Sussex SWC Walk 129 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

You could call this a variation on the Berwick to Eastbourne walk in Time Out Country Walks Volume 2. Like that walk, it passes through Wilmington and Jevington, visiting the Long Man of Wilmington en route. This walk, however, takes the more direct Wealdway route to Wilmington (borrowed from Free Walk 90 Berwick to Seaford on this site) and then goes across the top of the South Downs to Jevington. After that, the walk follows a long ridge with fine views to the village of Friston, from where you can walk down onto Flagstaff Point, one of the Seven Sisters, to end the walk at Birling Gap.

Note that the ending at Birling Gap only works when the 13X bus is running. This runs throughout the year on Sundays, at weekends and on bank holidays from April to June and daily from late June to late September. If the 13X is not running, you can finish the walk at Friston, taking the number 12 bus to Eastbourne or Seaford to return home, or walk from Flagstaff point to Exceat to catch the number 12 from there (a route 2.4km/1.5 miles longer than the one to Birling Gap).

An alternative idea is to walk the short distance from Friston to East Dean, where there are various tea options: see walk directions and the Tea section below for details

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Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes to Brighton

Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes to Brighton

Rottingdean Bowls at Kipling Gardens with the Black Windmill behind

01-Jun-10 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club Extra Walk 134: Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean

Saturday Walkers Club Extra Walk 134: Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean

Rottingdean and Roedean by the sea

01-Jun-10 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club mid-week walk from Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean

Saturday Walkers Club mid-week walk from Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean

Typical day on The South Downs Way above Kingston near Lewes

01-Jun-10 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean, East Sussex

Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean, East Sussex

'...towards the direction of the V-shaped paths ahead on the Downs,'

01-Jun-10 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes, East Sussex to Rottingdean

Saturday Walkers Club walk from Lewes, East Sussex to Rottingdean

Southover Grange Gardens, Lewes, East Sussex

01-Jun-13 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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View from the downs near the start

View from the downs near the start

Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean walk

19-Jul-15 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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Approaching Rottingdean

Approaching Rottingdean

Lewes to Brighton via Rottingdean walk

19-Jul-15 • Saturdaywalker on Flickr

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The less-frequented heart of the South Downs to Rottingdean, with a pleasant walk along the promenade into Brighton to finish

East Sussex SWC Walk 134 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This route uses the same fine downland start as Time Out Country Walks Volume Two, Walk 24, Lewes to Saltdean, with imagnificent views across the plains of the river Ouse. After that, it crosses the remoter, less frequented heart of the downs to Rottingdean, a village on the outskirts of Brighton. The sea is in view throughout this part of the walk, and in winter the low-angled sun turns it a glittering silver.

You can finish the walk at Rottingdean, taking very regular buses into Brighton. Alternatively, you can walk the attractive esplanade along the base of the cliffs to Brighton Pier. Though this section of the route is not a country walk by any stretch of the imagination, for at least the first two and a half kilometres it is a lot wilder than you might expect, and on a sunny afternoon the white cliffs against blue sky and the sun reflecting off the sea can make it feel positively Mediterranean. The same buses that serve Rottingdean also stop at many points along this route, and most terminate at Brighton station, so you can end the walk whenever you like.

Assuming you do not take the bus, eventually you come to the garish confusion around Brighton Pier, from where the walk offers a route to the station that takes in the Brighton Pavillion and the North Laines.

Full Details

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sea view from the coast path

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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sea view looking west

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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steps on the coast path down to fairlight glen

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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view of eroding cliffs from the coast path through bracken

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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End of the path down to beach from Fairlight Glen

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy on Flickr

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End of the path down to beach from Fairlight Glen

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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Fairlight Glen beach at high tide

23-Jun-12 • Andrew Murphy

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Hilly cliff top path via remote Fairlight Glen naturist beach to Fireheights. Return by the same path, a gentler inland route, or along the seashore

East Sussex SWC Walk 169 • Toughness: 10/10 • Length: 8 miles (13 km)

This is a dramatic and hilly coastal cliff top walk from Hastings to the hidden and very pretty Fairlight Glen beach (which is used by naturists), and on to to Fireheights beacon - with fine views of the surrounding coastline. There are 4 options for the return: a) by the same strenuous route, b) a beach route past a newly formed undercliff, c) a forested route which contours around some of the steep glens of the coast path, and d) an inland route via North's Seat (hill). In fact any of the 4 routes could be used for either the out or return journey. Finally, at the start (or finish) of the walk, there is are options to visit Hasting's working sea front with its art gallery and shingle beach launched fishing boats, its old town with shops and cafes, and a city centre hill to visit the ruins of Hastings' castle.

There are already 2 SWC walks in this area, TOCW2 Hastings to Rye, and TOCW1 Rye to Hastings - this walk, and they, all share the dramatic cliff top walk out of Hastings. This walk aims to make a circular walk back to Hastings, giving time to visit Fairlight Glen beach, and further explore this very pretty coast. Why? Beyond Fireheights (the route onwards to Winchelsea and Rye) by Fairlight village, the coastal path has fallen away, and the new "coast path" is actually inland along (quiet) roads for quite some distance - an anti-climax after the coastal views at the start of the walk.

The walk starts in Hastings. Here you can either walk along the slightly tacky seafront to the old town, or climb over a hill to visit Hasting's castle

The 2 routes meet up at the old town, a narrow pedestrianised lane full of old pubs and small independent shops. In front of the old town is the working beach, with its distinctive black clapperboard houses, beach launched fishing boats, Jerwood Art Galley, and a nice view from the sea wall.

From here, there is a choice of 4 routes through Hastings County Park to Fireheights beacon, each is around 6 km / 4 miles

  1. Cliff top path via...

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Glorious ramble over the South Downs to the sea covering areas less frequently walked

East Sussex SWC Walk 181 • Toughness: 8/10 • Length: 14 miles (23 km)

This walk, along with the shorter options below, is mainly along ridges and offers superb downland views throughout with two excellent lunch-time pubs. The beauty of this walk is that you can see the way ahead so direction finding is fairly easy.

  • The walk starts in Lewes, crosses the River Ouse in the town centre and then climbs a lane to a golf club car-park. You then take a signposted path following a circular ridge route, with glorious views throughout followed by a long descent into Glynde. (6.1km, 3.8miles)
  • From Glynde station you pass the Trevor Arms , a possible early lunch-time pub stop, go through the village to cross over the busy A24 and then take a route passing Preston Court Farm. You go through the entrance to Firle Park, cross a field and enter the village of West Firle for lunch and drinks at the Ram Inn. (2.6km, 1.6 miles)
  • From the Ram Inn you take the road through the village to start a long climb up,to a spot near Firle Beacon. You then follow a clear path at the top of the ridge heading for two large radio masts clearly visible in the distance. You pass these and then at the next field boundary find a gently descending path which eventually brings you to Bishopstone and from there to Seaford. (14.2km, 8.9 miles)

Author's Note: This is not the 15.4m Lewes to Seaford walk 24c in Time Book of Country Walks Volume 2 but a shorter, more direct variation which links sections of three different SWC walks to provide a glorious ramble over the South Downs covering areas less frequently walked. The shorter options from Glynde are suitable not just for summer but spring and autumn also and possibly in winter if done at a brisk pace and the weather is clear and fine. The main 14.3m walk is a companion walk to Book 1 Walk 31, Glynde to Seaford and Free Walk 47, Lewes circular via Glynde and Southease.

Full Details

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Into St Alban's churchyard, Frant

30-Oct-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Italian Garden, Calverley Grounds

07-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Tunbridge Wells station

13-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Leaving Frant

13-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Vine, Wadhurst

19-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Sussex Border Path near The Mount

19-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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The Mount

19-Nov-13 • Sean O'Neill

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Plenty of fine views on this short High Weald walk to the spa town of Royal Tunbridge Wells

East Sussex SWC Walk 196 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 8 miles (14 km)

This short walk near the border of East Sussex and Kent takes in similar territory to the Wealden walks from Book 2, with the first 1 km being the same as Walk 18 (Wadhurst Circular). The first part of the walk is along the Sussex Border Path, a long-distance east-west route which here includes open ridges with fine views, interspersed with short sections across streams in wooded valleys. The latter provided the water power for the Wealden iron industry, Britain's ‘first industrial revolution’; in the 16th & 17thC this would have been a busy industrial area but today only traces remain in names like Furnace Wood.

On the other side of the A267 the scene changes to the landscaped parkland of the Nevill Estate's Eridge Old Park, where the colours on the mature beech trees are particularly attractive in late autumn. A permissive path along its eastern boundary takes you to a lunch stop in the elegant hill-top village of Frant, dominated by its large triangular green.

On the short afternoon section you soon reach the outskirts of Tunbridge Wells, where a relatively traffic-free route along back streets and quiet alleys takes you down to its High Street. This spa town developed in the 17thC after an influential nobleman staying nearby became convinced that the iron-rich water from its chalybeate spring had curative properties. Its popularity waned in the 18thC when sea bathing became more fashionable than ‘taking the waters’, but revived after regular visits from Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. The town's popularity with the royal family led to it being granted the “Royal” prefix in 1909.

Full Details

Nice tree

Nice tree

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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Summer snowflake

Summer snowflake

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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A bend in the road

A bend in the road

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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A view unfolds

A view unfolds

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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Old barn

Old barn

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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Prominent tree

Prominent tree

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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Stating the obvious

Stating the obvious

Etchingham to Wadhurst

22-Mar-14 • moontiger on Flickr

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Hilly Wealden landscapes, ancient villages and Bewl Water reservoir

East Sussex SWC Walk 208 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 10 miles (17 km)

After a fairly flat start across the valley of the River Rother, this is a classic Wealden walk with all the usual elements - a hilly mix of pasture and woodland, fine panoramic views across valleys, a succession of converted oast houses, a cobnut orchard, and the typical Wealden villages of Ticehurst and Wadhurst. The route also passes very close to the shore of the beautiful Bewl Water reservoir and there are optional extra sections (see Walk Options below) which take you down to hidden places on its shoreline.

While the walk is very rural throughout, there are three sections of road walking. One is a necessary 2km (1.2 mile) walk along the main road through the village of Ticehurst, which can be broken up by a visit to the pretty village centre (or even lunch at The Bell, though the Bull Inn in Three Leg Cross 1.1km/0.7 miles further on is highly recommended). The other two are idyllic saunters down back lanes whose verges are alive with wild flowers in spring. The first of these is just after lunch, a 2.1km (1.3 miles) back lane which was cut off by the construction of the reservoir and is now something of a hidden lost world. The other is the 3.3km (2 mile) ending from Wadhurst village to Wadhurst station.

These road sections, and others on gravel tracks and lanes make this walk fairly well suited to winter, which is also the time when the somewhat early closing times of the Wadhurst tea rooms will be less of a problem. At this time of year there could be flooding at the start of the walk, where it crosses the Rother valley, though there is a road alternative to this if necessary.

Easily the best time to do the walk is in spring, however, when the lanes verges are covered in flowers and this ancient landscape looks at its best. This is also an idyllic walk for a summer day, when there is ample daylight for a leisurely exploration of the margins of Bewl Water, or in October, when the wooded landscape provides plenty of autumn colour.

Full Details

Flowerboat

Flowerboat

Newhaven bypass

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Bridge opening times

Bridge opening times

Newhaven

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Large bird

Large bird

Newhaven's river

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Large bird

Large bird

Newhaven's river

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Fort - WW1 vintage

Fort - WW1 vintage

Newhaven

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Clifftop congestion

Clifftop congestion

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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Looking back...

Looking back...

...towards Newhaven

18-Apr-14 • magyardave2002 on Flickr

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A Victorian Fort, White Cliffs, cliff top and cliff bottom paths, Brighton's busy pier and promenade and quieter Hove

East Sussex SWC Walk 213 • Toughness: 3/10 • Length: 11 miles (19 km)

This coastal walks has a varied mix - a Victorian Fort, White Cliffs, an under-cliff path, Brighton's marina, busy promenades and board walks passing Brighton's pier, shops, cafes, and, on sunny days thousands of day trippers. Then it quieter promenade and beach huts, before ending in Portslade.

The walk starts at Newhaven Town station. Cross the river, and walk down to the coast, with an easy climb over castle hill to the walls of the Victorian Newhaven Fort (a pleasant WW1 themed tourist attraction), for the view along the coast. Head down to the breakwater, and then head west, rejoining the cliff path

Head west for some miles on a gently undulating cliff top path, rural at first, then passing seafront houses of Peacehaven, then Telescombe, but still great views out to sea. You pass 2 places with access down to the sea shore (and under-cliff path), and 3 pubs with sea view from the patio - The Peacehaven (very cheap), the Telescombe Tavern (good), and the Smuggler's Rest (expensive). Eventually the path comes close to a busy coastal road as you descend to Saltdean and its Lido. Here you join the under-cliff path (hard surface) and escape the noise of the coast road. (You can continue along the cliff top path, but its a bit close to the noisy coast road)

Its 3.4km to Brighton Marina. Cross the lock gates - its nicer, and the path shown on the OS map behind the marina is usually closed due to rock falls. Continue past the yachts (even the mooring fees are eye-watering), until you reach The West Quay pub (Wetherspoons) with nice views over the yachty basin.

Continue through the Marina (in front of a car park, past McDonalds and Adsa), and continue along Marina Drive (at the foot of a low cliff), with a shingle beach to your left. Pass Brighton's slightly tacky nudist beach, and eventually, on sunny summer days, you'll start to see thousands on people clustered either side of the pier. The pier (free entry) is worth a stroll. Starlings swarm around it at sunset.

Turn...

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Signal Box at Uckfield station

Signal Box at Uckfield station

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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Specially shaped sign to discourage hoodlums from adding a letter

Specially shaped sign to discourage hoodlums from adding a letter

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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Buttressed bridge remnants of the - never finished - Ouse Valley Railway

Buttressed bridge remnants of the - never finished - Ouse Valley Railway

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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River Uck

River Uck

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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Course of the Wealden Line, SW of Uckfield, near Owlsbury Farm

Course of the Wealden Line, SW of Uckfield, near Owlsbury Farm

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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South Downs views, from near Horsted Green

South Downs views, from near Horsted Green

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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Cute Building, Dick's Barn, Horsted Green

Cute Building, Dick's Barn, Horsted Green

SWC Walk 262 Uckfield to Buxted

08-Mar-16 • thomasgrabow on Flickr

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Uck Valley, undulating Low Weald Countryside, van Hoogstraten's path, Blackboys Inn, Tickerage Stream valley with Vivien Leigh's home, and Buxted Park

East Sussex SWC Walk 262 • Toughness: 5/10 • Length: 13 miles (22 km)

This undulating amble through some varied scenery in the Low Weald Countryside provides ample South Downs views in the morning from the Uck valley and on the way to and through the East Sussex National Golf Course, before turning north east through the High Cross estate, owned by property developer Nicholas van Hoogstraten, who was at the centre of various legal battles with The Ramblers after blocking or otherwise obstructing rights-of-ways across this estate.

You then pass a couple of manor houses, one with pretty ornamental lakes and ornate landscaped gardens, en route to lunch at the charming 14th century Blackboys Inn in Blackboys.

From lunch the route turns west along Vanguard Way and Wealdway for a long stretch through the tranquil valley of the Tickerage Stream, past Tickerage Mill, Vivien Leigh’s abode in the final years of her life, and finishes through Buxted Park, an old deer park in Ashdown Forest parkland, past the very large, elegant Palladian Buxted House (now a hotel) in its hilltop position.

Disclaimer: there are plenty of stiles on this walk, and the morning section has some very mud-prone parts.

Full Details

Hemlock Water Dropwort

Hemlock Water Dropwort

Britains most poisonous plant http://emj.bmj.com/content/19/5/472.full" rel="nofollow emj.bmj.com/content/19/5/472.full Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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Cow by the Ouse

Cow by the Ouse

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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Cow by the Ouse

Cow by the Ouse

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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by the Ouse

by the Ouse

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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The Anchor

The Anchor

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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Pekin ducks

Pekin ducks

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

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Horses

Horses

Uckfield to Lewes

04-Jun-12 • moontiger on Flickr

newwalk swcwalks uckfieldtolewes

A gentle walk along river valleys through fields and woods, finishing with a climb over the South Downs above Glyndebourne

East Sussex SWC Walk 272 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 12 miles (21 km)

A gentle walk along river valleys through fields and woods, finishing with a climb over the South Downs above Glyndebourne

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Tamworth pigs

Tamworth pigs

24-Sep-16 • andympoole11 on Flickr

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Shipley windmill

Shipley windmill

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

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Knepp Castle

Knepp Castle

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

swcwalks swcwalk283

Fallow deer

Fallow deer

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

swcwalks swcwalk283

Old English Longhorn cattle

Old English Longhorn cattle

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

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Pond and Roe deer from lookout

Pond and Roe deer from lookout

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

swcwalks swcwalk283

Barnhouse Farm pond

Barnhouse Farm pond

13-Feb-17 • andympoole11 on Flickr

swcwalks swcwalk283

Long flat walk with an emphasis on fauna in a re-wilding area, and passing several historic buildings.

East Sussex SWC Walk 283 • Toughness: 4/10 • Length: 16 miles (27 km)

The aim of this walk is to visit the estate of Knepp Castle where a re-wilding project has been going for over 10 years. Good opportunity to see Old English Longhorn Cattle, Tamworth Pigs, Exmoor Ponies and Fallow and Roe Deer. The walk passes through this re-wilding area before and after the lunch stop.bold

Before lunch views of Shipley windmill and Knepp Castle are seen, although neither are open to the public. After lunch pass by a listed farmhouse and an old Quaker Meeting House. Those shortening the walk by using the bus will pass what remains of Old Knepp Castleitalic

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